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Decadal declines in avian herbivore reproduction: density‐dependent nutrition and phenological mismatch in the Arctic

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology, June 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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50 Dimensions

Readers on

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82 Mendeley
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Title
Decadal declines in avian herbivore reproduction: density‐dependent nutrition and phenological mismatch in the Arctic
Published in
Ecology, June 2017
DOI 10.1002/ecy.1856
Pubmed ID
Authors

Megan V. Ross, Ray T. Alisauskas, David C. Douglas, Dana K. Kellett

Abstract

A full understanding of population dynamics depends not only on estimation of mechanistic contributions of recruitment and survival, but also knowledge about the ecological processes that drive each of these vital rates. The process of recruitment in particular may be protracted over several years, and can depend on numerous ecological complexities until sexually mature adulthood is attained. We addressed long term declines (23 breeding seasons, 1992-2014) in the per capita production of young by both Ross's geese (Chen rossii) and lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) nesting at Karrak Lake in Canada's central arctic. During this period there was a contemporaneous increase from 0.4 to 1.1 million adults nesting at this colony. We evaluated whether (i) density-dependent nutritional deficiencies of pre-breeding females or (ii) phenological mismatch between peak gosling hatch and peak forage quality, inferred from NDVI on the brood-rearing areas, may have been behind decadal declines in the per capita production of goslings. We found that, in years when pre-breeding females arrived to the nesting grounds with diminished nutrient reserves, the proportional composition of young during brood-rearing was reduced for both species. Furthermore, increased mismatch between peak gosling hatch and peak forage quality contributed additively to further declines in gosling production, in addition to declines caused by delayed nesting with associated subsequent negative effects on clutch size and nest success. The degree of mismatch increased over the course of our study because of advanced vegetation phenology without a corresponding advance in goose nesting phenology. Vegetation phenology was significantly earlier in years with warm surface air temperatures measured in spring (i.e., 25 May - 30 June). We suggest that both increased phenological mismatch and reduced nutritional condition of arriving females were behind declines in population-level recruitment, leading to the recent attenuation in population growth of snow geese. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 82 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 20%
Student > Master 14 17%
Researcher 12 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Professor 4 5%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 19 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 48%
Environmental Science 19 23%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 1%
Unknown 21 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,058,712
of 20,214,361 outputs
Outputs from Ecology
#2,754
of 6,315 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,950
of 281,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology
#52
of 93 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,214,361 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,315 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,796 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 93 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.