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The trajectory, structure and origin of the Chelyabinsk asteroidal impactor

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
87 news outlets
blogs
15 blogs
twitter
35 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
128 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
The trajectory, structure and origin of the Chelyabinsk asteroidal impactor
Published in
Nature, November 2013
DOI 10.1038/nature12671
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jiří Borovička, Pavel Spurný, Peter Brown, Paul Wiegert, Pavel Kalenda, David Clark, Lukáš Shrbený

Abstract

Earth is continuously colliding with fragments of asteroids and comets of various sizes. The largest encounter in historical times occurred over the Tunguska river in Siberia in 1908, producing an airburst of energy equivalent to 5-15 megatons of trinitrotoluene (1 kiloton of trinitrotoluene represents an energy of 4.185 × 10(12) joules). Until recently, the next most energetic airburst events occurred over Indonesia in 2009 and near the Marshall Islands in 1994, both with energies of several tens of kilotons. Here we report an analysis of selected video records of the Chelyabinsk superbolide of 15 February 2013, with energy equivalent to 500 kilotons of trinitrotoluene, and details of its atmospheric passage. We found that its orbit was similar to the orbit of the two-kilometre-diameter asteroid 86039 (1999 NC43), to a degree of statistical significance sufficient to suggest that the two were once part of the same object. The bulk strength--the ability to resist breakage--of the Chelyabinsk asteroid, of about one megapascal, was similar to that of smaller meteoroids and corresponds to a heavily fractured single stone. The asteroid broke into small pieces between the altitudes of 45 and 30 kilometres, preventing more-serious damage on the ground. The total mass of surviving fragments larger than 100 grams was lower than expected.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
France 2 3%
Brazil 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Greece 1 1%
Unknown 67 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 27 35%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 21%
Student > Bachelor 8 10%
Student > Master 7 9%
Professor 5 6%
Other 14 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 27 35%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 20 26%
Unspecified 7 9%
Engineering 6 8%
Chemistry 6 8%
Other 11 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 856. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 September 2019.
All research outputs
#5,561
of 13,533,438 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#887
of 69,884 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63
of 184,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#13
of 994 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,533,438 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 69,884 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 76.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 184,431 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 994 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.