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Long-term impact of self-financed rotavirus vaccines on rotavirus-associated hospitalizations and costs in the Valencia Region, Spain

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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42 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
Long-term impact of self-financed rotavirus vaccines on rotavirus-associated hospitalizations and costs in the Valencia Region, Spain
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2380-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alejandro Orrico-Sanchez, Mónica López-Lacort, Silvia Pérez-Vilar, Javier Díez-Domingo

Abstract

Rotavirus vaccines are available in Spain from 2007. They are recommended by the Spanish Pediatric Association, but not funded by the National Health System (NHS) and its coverage rate reached 40-50%. The hospitalization rate reduction of rotavirus caused gastroenteritis (RVAGE) directly attributable to vaccination remains unclear due to the large differences described in published studies, ranging from 14 to 44.5% in children <5 years of age, even with similar vaccination coverage. These results could be partly explained by variability in hospitalization policies, different study designs and the timeframe of observation. In addition, the direct economic impact of the reduction of hospitalizations has never been estimated. Therefore, there is a need to analyze the long-term impact of rotavirus vaccines on RVAGE and all cause gastroenteritis (AGE) hospitalizations and the national health system associated costs, minimizing potential confounders or biases. A population-based, ecological study using the hospital discharge registry's Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS) and the vaccine register (SIV) was performed, among Valencia Region's children <5 years old, during 2002 - 2015. RVAGE and AGE hospitalization risk was analyzed by vaccine coverage and adjusted by the total hospitalization rate for all causes to avoid external biases. The impact of AGE-associated health care utilization in prevaccine (2003-2006) versus postvaccine (2008-2014) years was also assessed. After vaccines licensure, the incidence of RVAGE-associated hospitalizations decreased markedly. A general vaccine coverage-related reduction in RVAGE or AGE-hospitalizations risk was observed in all age groups. Compared with unvaccinated children, RVAGE hospitalization risk decreased by 67% (95% CI: 55-67), 71% (95% CI: 58-81) and 68% (95% CI: 18-92) in children 0, 1 and 4 years of age, respectively, with a vaccination coverage between 40 and 42%. Overall, the hospital related costs were reduced around EUR 6 Mill per 10(5) children in 7 years. Despite the low-medium vaccine coverage, the introduction of rotavirus vaccines had a specific coverage-related response impact in the hospitalizations for RVAGE and AGE in children <5 years and their use substantially reduced hospital related costs. The model used reassures that the estimated impact is due to the vaccination and not to other external factors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 22%
Student > Master 10 19%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 13%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 15 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2019.
All research outputs
#850,588
of 18,353,936 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#155
of 6,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,642
of 276,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,353,936 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,438 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,901 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them