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Adult height variants affect birth length and growth rate in children

Overview of attention for article published in Human Molecular Genetics, July 2011
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Title
Adult height variants affect birth length and growth rate in children
Published in
Human Molecular Genetics, July 2011
DOI 10.1093/hmg/ddr309
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lavinia Paternoster, Laura D. Howe, Kate Tilling, Michael N. Weedon, Rachel M. Freathy, Timothy M. Frayling, John P. Kemp, George Davey Smith, Nicholas J. Timpson, Susan M. Ring, David M. Evans, Debbie A. Lawlor

Abstract

Previous studies identified 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with adult height, explaining ∼10% of the variance. The age at which these begin to affect growth is unclear. We modelled the effect of these SNPs on birth length and childhood growth. A total of 7768 participants in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children had data available. Individual growth trajectories from 0 to 10 years were estimated using mixed-effects linear spline models and differences in trajectories by individual SNPs and allelic score were determined. The allelic score was associated with birth length (0.026 cm increase per 'tall' allele, SE = 0.003, P = 1 × 10(-15), equivalent to 0.017 SD). There was little evidence of association between the allelic score and early infancy growth (0-3 months), but there was evidence of association between the allelic score and later growth. This association became stronger with each consecutive growth period, per 'tall' allele per month effects were 0.015 SD (3 months-1 year, SE = 0.004), 0.023 SD (1-3 years, SE = 0.003) and 0.028 SD (3-10 years, SE = 0.003). By age 10, the mean height difference between individuals with ≤170 versus ≥191 'tall' alleles (the top and bottom 10%) was 4.7 cm (0.8 SD), explaining ∼5% of the variance. There was evidence of associations with specific growth periods for some SNPs (rs3791675, EFEMP1 and rs6569648, L3MBTL3) and supportive evidence for previously reported age-dependent effects of HHIP and SOCS2 SNPs. SNPs associated with adult height influence birth length and have an increasing effect on growth from late infancy through to late childhood. By age 10, they explain half the height variance (∼5%) of that explained in adults (∼10%).

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 3%
United Kingdom 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 30 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 24%
Researcher 8 24%
Student > Master 4 12%
Lecturer 3 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 9%
Other 8 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 15%
Unspecified 4 12%
Psychology 2 6%
Other 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2011.
All research outputs
#9,442,219
of 12,320,465 outputs
Outputs from Human Molecular Genetics
#5,470
of 6,261 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,194
of 83,505 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Molecular Genetics
#31
of 38 outputs
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