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Origin of Interfacial Nanoscopic Gaseous Domains and Formation of Dense Gas Layer at Hydrophobic Solid–Water Interface

Overview of attention for article published in Langmuir, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

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2 tweeters

Citations

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32 Dimensions

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28 Mendeley
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Title
Origin of Interfacial Nanoscopic Gaseous Domains and Formation of Dense Gas Layer at Hydrophobic Solid–Water Interface
Published in
Langmuir, November 2013
DOI 10.1021/la403187p
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hong Peng, Greg R. Birkett, Anh V. Nguyen

Abstract

Interfacial gas enrichment (IGE) covering the entire area of hydrophobic solid-water interface has recently been detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and hypothesized to be responsible for the unexpected stability and anomalous contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles and the significant change from DLVO to non-DLVO forces. In this paper, we provide further proof of the existence of IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) by molecular dynamic simulation. Nitrogen gas adsorption at the water-graphite interface is investigated using molecular dynamic simulation at 300 K and 1 atm normal pressure. The results show that a DGL with a density equivalent to a gas at pressure of 500 atm is formed and equilibrated with a normal pressure of 1 atm. By varying the number of gas molecules in the system, we observe several types of dense gas domains: aggregates, cylindrical caps, and DGLs. Spherical cap gas domains form during the simulation but are unstable and always revert to another type of gas domain. Furthermore, the calculated surface potential of the DGL-water interface, -17.5 mV, is significantly closer to 0 than the surface potential, -65 mV, of normal gas bubble-water interface. This result supports our previously stated hypothesis that the change in surface potential causes the switch from repulsion to attraction for an AFM tip when the graphite surface is covered by an IGE layer. The change in surface potential comes from the structure change of water molecules at the DGL-water interface as compared with the normal gas-water interface. In addition, the contact angle of the cylindrical cap high density nitrogen gas domains is 141°. This contact angle is far greater than 85° observed for water on graphite at ambient conditions and much closer to the 150° contact angle observed for nanobubbles in experiments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 4%
Israel 1 4%
Japan 1 4%
Unknown 25 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 32%
Student > Master 6 21%
Researcher 4 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Other 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 9 32%
Physics and Astronomy 7 25%
Chemistry 3 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Mathematics 2 7%
Other 5 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2013.
All research outputs
#1,870,268
of 4,507,509 outputs
Outputs from Langmuir
#434
of 1,848 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,176
of 103,504 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Langmuir
#16
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,509 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,848 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 103,504 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.