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Effects of Acidic Deposition and Soil Acidification on Sugar Maple Trees in the Adirondack Mountains, New York

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, November 2013
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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56 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of Acidic Deposition and Soil Acidification on Sugar Maple Trees in the Adirondack Mountains, New York
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, November 2013
DOI 10.1021/es401864w
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. J. Sullivan, G. B. Lawrence, S. W. Bailey, T. C. McDonnell, C. M. Beier, K. C. Weathers, G. T. McPherson, D. A. Bishop

Abstract

We documented the effects of acidic atmospheric deposition and soil acidification on the canopy health, basal area increment, and regeneration of sugar maple (SM) trees across the Adirondack region of New York State, in the northeastern United States, where SM are plentiful but not well studied and where widespread depletion of soil calcium (Ca) has been documented. Sugar maple is a dominant canopy species in the Adirondack Mountain ecoregion, and it has a high demand for Ca. Trees in this region growing on soils with poor acid-base chemistry (low exchangeable Ca and % base saturation [BS]) that receive relatively high levels of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition exhibited a near absence of SM seedling regeneration and lower crown vigor compared with study plots with relatively high exchangeable Ca and BS and lower levels of acidic deposition. Basal area increment averaged over the 20th century was correlated (p < 0.1) with acid-base chemistry of the Oa, A, and upper B soil horizons. A lack of Adirondack SM regeneration, reduced canopy condition, and possibly decreased basal area growth over recent decades are associated with low concentrations of nutrient base cations in this region that has undergone soil Ca depletion from acidic deposition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 5%
Japan 1 2%
China 1 2%
Unknown 59 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 25%
Student > Master 13 20%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 5 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 27 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 22%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 8 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2014.
All research outputs
#1,920,099
of 5,028,713 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#2,346
of 5,109 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,463
of 108,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#99
of 260 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,028,713 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 61st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,109 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 108,684 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 260 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.