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Towards an HIV cure: science and debate from the International AIDS Society 2013 symposium

Overview of attention for article published in Retrovirology, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#44 of 619)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
19 Mendeley
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Title
Towards an HIV cure: science and debate from the International AIDS Society 2013 symposium
Published in
Retrovirology, November 2013
DOI 10.1186/1742-4690-10-134
Pubmed ID
Authors

Damian FJ Purcell, Julian H Elliott, Anna-Laura Ross, John Frater

Abstract

The International AIDS Society convened the multi-stakeholder "Towards an HIV Cure" symposium in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in 2013 to address the significant research challenges posed by the search for a cure for HIV infection. Current antiretroviral regimens select for a small reservoir of cells that harbour latent HIV provirus, produce few or no HIV virions, and resist detection or clearance by host immunity. The symposium examined basic molecular science and animal model data, and emerging and ongoing clinical trial results to prioritise strategies and determine the viral and immune responses that could lead to HIV remission without ART. Here we review the presentations that scrutinized the molecular mechanisms controlling virus expression from proviral DNA, and the intrinsic cellular restriction and immune mechanisms preventing viral production. Insights from the basic science have translated into new therapeutic strategies seeking HIV remission without ongoing therapy, and much interest was focused on these ongoing trials. We also summarise the emerging ethical issues and patient expectations as concepts move into the clinic.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 11%
Denmark 1 5%
Unknown 16 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 42%
Researcher 5 26%
Student > Master 3 16%
Other 2 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 47%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 26%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 January 2015.
All research outputs
#1,120,996
of 12,434,754 outputs
Outputs from Retrovirology
#44
of 619 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,650
of 176,146 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Retrovirology
#6
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,434,754 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 619 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 176,146 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.