↓ Skip to main content

Workgroup Report: Drinking-Water Nitrate and Health—Recent Findings and Research Needs

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health Perspectives, November 2005
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
403 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
385 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Workgroup Report: Drinking-Water Nitrate and Health—Recent Findings and Research Needs
Published in
Environmental Health Perspectives, November 2005
DOI 10.1289/ehp.8043
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mary H. Ward, Theo M. deKok, Patrick Levallois, Jean Brender, Gabriel Gulis, Bernard T. Nolan, James VanDerslice

Abstract

Human alteration of the nitrogen cycle has resulted in steadily accumulating nitrate in our water resources. The U.S. maximum contaminant level and World Health Organization guidelines for nitrate in drinking water were promulgated to protect infants from developing methemoglobinemia, an acute condition. Some scientists have recently suggested that the regulatory limit for nitrate is overly conservative; however, they have not thoroughly considered chronic health outcomes. In August 2004, a symposium on drinking-water nitrate and health was held at the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology meeting to evaluate nitrate exposures and associated health effects in relation to the current regulatory limit. The contribution of drinking-water nitrate toward endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds was evaluated with a focus toward identifying subpopulations with increased rates of nitrosation. Adverse health effects may be the result of a complex interaction of the amount of nitrate ingested, the concomitant ingestion of nitrosation cofactors and precursors, and specific medical conditions that increase nitrosation. Workshop participants concluded that more experimental studies are needed and that a particularly fruitful approach may be to conduct epidemiologic studies among susceptible subgroups with increased endogenous nitrosation. The few epidemiologic studies that have evaluated intake of nitrosation precursors and/or nitrosation inhibitors have observed elevated risks for colon cancer and neural tube defects associated with drinking-water nitrate concentrations below the regulatory limit. The role of drinking-water nitrate exposure as a risk factor for specific cancers, reproductive outcomes, and other chronic health effects must be studied more thoroughly before changes to the regulatory level for nitrate in drinking water can be considered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 385 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 2%
Germany 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Ecuador 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 368 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 74 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 73 19%
Student > Master 70 18%
Student > Bachelor 60 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 22 6%
Other 54 14%
Unknown 32 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 101 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 84 22%
Engineering 34 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 29 8%
Chemistry 28 7%
Other 63 16%
Unknown 46 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2017.
All research outputs
#1,847,372
of 13,369,813 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health Perspectives
#1,880
of 6,772 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,391
of 182,539 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health Perspectives
#14
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,369,813 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,772 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 182,539 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.