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A qualitative study of legal and social justice needs for people with aphasia

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Title
A qualitative study of legal and social justice needs for people with aphasia
Published in
International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2013
DOI 10.3109/17549507.2013.855260
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karen Morris, Alison Ferguson, Linda Worrall

Abstract

This paper presents an exploratory investigation of situations in which people with aphasia may be vulnerable to legal and access to justice issues. The study used a qualitative descriptive approach to analyse 167 de-identified transcriptions of previously collected interviews, with 50 participants with mild-to-severe aphasia following stroke, 48 family members, and their treating speech-language pathologists. Situations experienced by people with aphasia and their family members were coded using key-word searches based on the previously published framework developed by Ellison and colleagues to describe situations of vulnerability to legal and access to justice needs for older people. Health and financial and consumer situations were most frequently identified in the data. Additionally, there were a number of situations found specifically relating to people with aphasia involving their signatures and credit card use. Instances of discrimination and abuse were also identified, and, although infrequent, these issues point to the profound impact of aphasia on the ability to complain and, hence, to ensure rights to care are upheld. The findings of this study are consistent with previous research in suggesting that legal and access to justice needs are an important issue for people with aphasia and their families.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 19%
Student > Bachelor 3 19%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Other 4 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 19%
Chemistry 3 19%
Linguistics 2 13%
Social Sciences 2 13%
Other 3 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 December 2013.
All research outputs
#1,883,748
of 8,267,094 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
#136
of 360 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,887
of 133,860 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
#9
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,267,094 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 360 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 133,860 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.