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Tuberculosis control in China: use of modelling to develop targets and policies

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
52 Mendeley
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Title
Tuberculosis control in China: use of modelling to develop targets and policies
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, September 2015
DOI 10.2471/blt.15.154492
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hsien-Ho Lin, Lixia Wang, Hui Zhang, Yunzhou Ruan, Daniel P Chin, Christopher Dye

Abstract

It is unclear if current programmes in China can achieve the post-2015 global targets for tuberculosis - 50% reduction in incidence and a 75% reduction in mortality by 2025. Chinese policy-makers need to maintain the recent decline in the prevalence of tuberculosis, while revising control policies to cope with an epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis and the effects of ongoing health reform. Health reforms are expected to shift patients from tuberculosis dispensaries to designated hospitals. We developed a mathematical model of tuberculosis control in China to help set appropriate targets and prioritize interventions that might be implemented in the next 10 years. This model indicates that, even under the most optimistic scenario - improved treatment in tuberculosis dispensaries, introduction of a new effective regimen for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis and optimal care of cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis - the current global targets for tuberculosis are unlikely to be reached. However, reductions in the incidence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis should be feasible. We conclude that a shift of patients from tuberculosis dispensaries to designated hospitals is likely to hamper efforts at tuberculosis control if cure rates in the designated hospitals cannot be maintained at a high level. Our results can inform the planning of tuberculosis control in China.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Cambodia 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 50 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 21%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Researcher 8 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Other 4 8%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 9 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 15%
Social Sciences 7 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 12 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2015.
All research outputs
#5,609,310
of 17,364,317 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#1,858
of 3,940 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,629
of 275,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#32
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,364,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,940 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,073 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.