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Association between active commuting and incident cardiovascular disease, cancer, and mortality: prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in British Medical Journal, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 53,559)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
274 news outlets
blogs
21 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
6731 tweeters
facebook
73 Facebook pages
googleplus
12 Google+ users
reddit
4 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
242 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
514 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Association between active commuting and incident cardiovascular disease, cancer, and mortality: prospective cohort study
Published in
British Medical Journal, April 2017
DOI 10.1136/bmj.j1456
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carlos A Celis-Morales, Donald M Lyall, Paul Welsh, Jana Anderson, Lewis Steell, Yibing Guo, Reno Maldonado, Daniel F Mackay, Jill P Pell, Naveed Sattar, Jason M R Gill

Abstract

Objective To investigate the association between active commuting and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, and all cause mortality.Design Prospective population based study. Setting UK Biobank.Participants 263 450 participants (106 674 (52%) women; mean age 52.6), recruited from 22 sites across the UK. The exposure variable was the mode of transport used (walking, cycling, mixed mode v non-active (car or public transport)) to commute to and from work on a typical day.Main outcome measures Incident (fatal and non-fatal) CVD and cancer, and deaths from CVD, cancer, or any causes.Results 2430 participants died (496 were related to CVD and 1126 to cancer) over a median of 5.0 years (interquartile range 4.3-5.5) follow-up. There were 3748 cancer and 1110 CVD events. In maximally adjusted models, commuting by cycle and by mixed mode including cycling were associated with lower risk of all cause mortality (cycling hazard ratio 0.59, 95% confidence interval 0.42 to 0.83, P=0.002; mixed mode cycling 0.76, 0.58 to 1.00, P<0.05), cancer incidence (cycling 0.55, 0.44 to 0.69, P<0.001; mixed mode cycling 0.64, 0.45 to 0.91, P=0.01), and cancer mortality (cycling 0.60, 0.40 to 0.90, P=0.01; mixed mode cycling 0.68, 0.57 to 0.81, P<0.001). Commuting by cycling and walking were associated with a lower risk of CVD incidence (cycling 0.54, 0.33 to 0.88, P=0.01; walking 0.73, 0.54 to 0.99, P=0.04) and CVD mortality (cycling 0.48, 0.25 to 0.92, P=0.03; walking 0.64, 0.45 to 0.91, P=0.01). No statistically significant associations were observed for walking commuting and all cause mortality or cancer outcomes. Mixed mode commuting including walking was not noticeably associated with any of the measured outcomes.Conclusions Cycle commuting was associated with a lower risk of CVD, cancer, and all cause mortality. Walking commuting was associated with a lower risk of CVD independent of major measured confounding factors. Initiatives to encourage and support active commuting could reduce risk of death and the burden of important chronic conditions.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 514 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 6 1%
United States 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 501 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 99 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 74 14%
Researcher 68 13%
Student > Bachelor 61 12%
Other 36 7%
Other 104 20%
Unknown 72 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 127 25%
Sports and Recreations 45 9%
Engineering 42 8%
Social Sciences 38 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 30 6%
Other 119 23%
Unknown 113 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6509. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2021.
All research outputs
#265
of 18,449,552 outputs
Outputs from British Medical Journal
#9
of 53,559 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1
of 275,763 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Medical Journal
#1
of 858 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,449,552 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 53,559 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,763 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 858 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.