↓ Skip to main content

Interannual variation in methane emissions from tropical wetlands triggered by repeated El Niño Southern Oscillation

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, May 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
35 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Interannual variation in methane emissions from tropical wetlands triggered by repeated El Niño Southern Oscillation
Published in
Global Change Biology, May 2017
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13726
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qiuan Zhu, Changhui Peng, Philippe Ciais, Hong Jiang, Jinxun Liu, Philippe Bousquet, Shiqin Li, Jie Chang, Xiuqin Fang, Xiaolu Zhou, Huai Chen, Shirong Liu, Guanghui Lin, Peng Gong, Meng Wang, Han Wang, Wenhua Xiang, Jing Chen

Abstract

Methane (CH4 ) emissions from tropical wetlands contribute 60-80% of global natural wetland CH4 emissions. Decreased wetland CH4 emissions can act as a negative feedback mechanism for future climate warming and vice versa. The impact of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on CH4 emissions from wetlands remains poorly quantified at both regional and global scales, and El Niño events are expected to become more severe based on climate models projections. We use a process-based model of global wetland CH4 emissions to investigate the impacts of the ENSO on CH4 emissions in tropical wetlands for the period from 1950 to 2012. The results show that CH4 emissions from tropical wetlands respond strongly to repeated ENSO events, with negative anomalies occurring during El Niño periods and with positive anomalies occurring during La Niña periods. An approximately 8-month time-lag was detected between tropical wetland CH4 emissions and ENSO events, which was caused by the combined time lag effects of ENSO events on precipitation and temperature over tropical wetlands. The ENSO can explain 49% of inter-annual variations for tropical wetland CH4 emissions. Furthermore, relative to neutral years, changes in temperature have much stronger effects on tropical wetland CH4 emissions than the changes in precipitation during ENSO periods. The occurrence of several El Niño events contributed to a lower decadal mean growth rate in atmospheric CH4 concentrations throughout the 1980s and 1990s and to stable atmospheric CH4 concentrations from 1999 to 2006, resulting in negative feedback to global warming. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 31%
Researcher 7 20%
Unspecified 7 20%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 10 29%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 29%
Unspecified 8 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2017.
All research outputs
#1,051,564
of 13,144,984 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#1,275
of 3,571 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,825
of 263,283 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#49
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,144,984 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,571 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,283 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.