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A systematic review of rehabilitation interventions to prevent and treat depression in post-stroke aphasia

Overview of attention for article published in Disability & Rehabilitation, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 1,987)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

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81 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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8 Dimensions

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36 Mendeley
Title
A systematic review of rehabilitation interventions to prevent and treat depression in post-stroke aphasia
Published in
Disability & Rehabilitation, April 2017
DOI 10.1080/09638288.2017.1315181
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caroline Baker, Linda Worrall, Miranda Rose, Kyla Hudson, Brooke Ryan, Leana O’Byrne, Baker, Caroline, Worrall, Linda, Rose, Miranda, Hudson, Kyla, Ryan, Brooke, O’Byrne, Leana

Abstract

Stepped psychological care is the delivery of routine assessment and interventions for psychological problems, including depression. The aim of this systematic review was to analyze and synthesize the evidence of rehabilitation interventions to prevent and treat depression in post-stroke aphasia and adapt the best evidence within a stepped psychological care framework. Four databases were systematically searched up to March 2017: Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO and The Cochrane Library. Forty-five studies met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Level of evidence, methodological quality and results were assessed. People with aphasia with mild depression may benefit from psychosocial-type treatments (based on 3 level ii studies with small to medium effect sizes). For those without depression, mood may be enhanced through participation in a range of interventions (based on 4 level ii studies; 1 level iii-3 study and 6 level iv studies). It is not clear which interventions may prevent depression in post-stroke aphasia. No evidence was found for the treatment of moderate to severe depression in post-stroke aphasia. This study found some interventions that may improve depression outcomes for those with mild depression or without depression in post-stroke aphasia. Future research is needed to address methodological limitations and evaluate and support the translation of stepped psychological care across the continuum. Implications for Rehabilitation Stepped psychological care after stroke is a framework with levels 1 to 4 which can be used to prevent and treat depression for people with aphasia. A range of rehabilitation interventions may be beneficial to mood at level 1 for people without clinically significant depression (e.g., goal setting and achievement, psychosocial support, communication partner training and narrative therapy). People with mild symptoms of depression may benefit from interventions at level 2 (e.g., behavioral therapy, psychosocial support and problem solving). People with moderate to severe symptoms of depression require specialist mental health/behavioral services in collaboration with stroke care at levels 3 and 4 of stepped psychological care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 81 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 28%
Unspecified 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 7 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 25%
Unspecified 7 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 60. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2018.
All research outputs
#238,234
of 12,346,805 outputs
Outputs from Disability & Rehabilitation
#13
of 1,987 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,240
of 266,664 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Disability & Rehabilitation
#1
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,346,805 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,987 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,664 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.