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Ethnopharmacologic survey of medicinal plants used to treat human diseases by traditional medical practitioners in Dega Damot district, Amhara, Northwestern Ethiopia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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85 Mendeley
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Title
Ethnopharmacologic survey of medicinal plants used to treat human diseases by traditional medical practitioners in Dega Damot district, Amhara, Northwestern Ethiopia
Published in
BMC Research Notes, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13104-017-2482-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Muluken Wubetu, Tefera Abula, Getye Dejenu

Abstract

One of the services that plants provide for human beings is their wider medicinal application. Although it is not fully assessed, the practice and wider use of traditional medicine is frequent in Ethiopia. Studies conducted previously are confined to the perceptions of modern and traditional health practitioners about traditional medicine. A total of 45 informants were selected purposefully from the study area. For collecting the data, semi-structured interviewees, observation and field walks were employed from August 10 to September 30/2014. To summarize the information, descriptive statistical methods were applied. Sixty species of medicinal plants distributed in 42 families were collected and identified applied locally for the treatment of 55 human disorders. The most commonly treated ones were evil eye, malaria, wound, peptic ulcer disease and rabies. According to this study, leaves were the commonly used plant parts (36.5%) and 39% of the preparations were decoctions. Oral route, 43 (44%) was the commonly used route of application whereas most (54.8%) remedies were administered only once. Fourteen percent of preparations caused vomiting in addition most (40.4%) of the formulations was contraindicated for pregnant patients. Only seventeen percent of the formulations possessed drug food interactions. Most preparations were stored within clothes, 31 (29.8%). There exists a high (ICF = 0.8) evenness of plant use among healers for treating respiratory problems. Alliumsativum (FI = 0.75) for evil eye, Phytolacca dodecandra (FI = 0.8) for rabies and Croton macrostachyus (FI = 0.78) for treating malaria were medicinal plants with highest fidelity levels showing consistency of knowledge on species best treating power. This study also documented that drought, overgrazing and firewood collection are major threats. Dega Damot district is loaded in its medicinal plant diversity and indigenous knowledge though plants are highly affected by drought, overgrazing and firewood collection. Therefore awareness activities must be created among the district's population by concerned governmental and nongovernmental organizations about the value of medicinal plants and conservation of these plants. The healing potential and associated adverse issues of the claimed medicinal plants should be assessed before proposing for a broader utilization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 85 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 20%
Student > Bachelor 13 15%
Researcher 8 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 8%
Lecturer 4 5%
Other 16 19%
Unknown 20 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 15 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Other 18 21%
Unknown 24 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,349,046
of 12,384,832 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#609
of 2,768 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,651
of 263,465 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#7
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,384,832 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,768 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,465 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.