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G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica Communications, January 2013
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Title
G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica Communications, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/2051-5960-1-66
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kelsey L Whittier, Erin A Boese, Katherine N Gibson-Corley, Patricia A Kirby, Benjamin W Darbro, Qining Qian, Wendy J Ingram, Thomas Robertson, Marc Remke, Michael D Taylor, M O’Dorisio

Abstract

Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 28 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 39%
Student > Master 5 16%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Other 2 6%
Other 5 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 48%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 26%
Chemistry 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2013.
All research outputs
#9,996,058
of 12,489,036 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#467
of 574 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,982
of 234,213 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#10
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,489,036 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 574 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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