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Fine-Mapping the Genetic Association of the Major Histocompatibility Complex in Multiple Sclerosis: HLA and Non-HLA Effects

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Genetics, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
110 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
165 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Fine-Mapping the Genetic Association of the Major Histocompatibility Complex in Multiple Sclerosis: HLA and Non-HLA Effects
Published in
PLoS Genetics, November 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003926
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nikolaos A. Patsopoulos, Lisa F. Barcellos, Rogier Q. Hintzen, Catherine Schaefer, Cornelia M. van Duijn, Janelle A. Noble, Towfique Raj, Pierre-Antoine Gourraud, Barbara E. Stranger, Jorge Oksenberg, Tomas Olsson, Bruce V. Taylor, Stephen Sawcer, David A. Hafler, Mary Carrington, Philip L. De Jager, Paul I. W. de Bakker

Abstract

The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region is strongly associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility. HLA-DRB1*15:01 has the strongest effect, and several other alleles have been reported at different levels of validation. Using SNP data from genome-wide studies, we imputed and tested classical alleles and amino acid polymorphisms in 8 classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes in 5,091 cases and 9,595 controls. We identified 11 statistically independent effects overall: 6 HLA-DRB1 and one DPB1 alleles in class II, one HLA-A and two B alleles in class I, and one signal in a region spanning from MICB to LST1. This genomic segment does not contain any HLA class I or II genes and provides robust evidence for the involvement of a non-HLA risk allele within the MHC. Interestingly, this region contains the TNF gene, the cognate ligand of the well-validated TNFRSF1A MS susceptibility gene. The classical HLA effects can be explained to some extent by polymorphic amino acid positions in the peptide-binding grooves. This study dissects the independent effects in the MHC, a critical region for MS susceptibility that harbors multiple risk alleles.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 165 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 4 2%
United States 3 2%
Brazil 2 1%
Finland 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Unknown 152 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 40 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 21%
Student > Master 21 13%
Student > Bachelor 16 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 10%
Other 37 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 59 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 44 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 12%
Unspecified 17 10%
Neuroscience 11 7%
Other 15 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2014.
All research outputs
#708,831
of 12,089,123 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Genetics
#977
of 6,175 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,841
of 203,011 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Genetics
#24
of 171 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,089,123 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,175 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 203,011 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 171 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.