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Hepatocarcinogenesis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in Japan

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
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Title
Hepatocarcinogenesis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in Japan
Published in
Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, November 2013
DOI 10.1111/jgh.12239
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katsutoshi Tokushige, Etsuko Hashimoto, Kazuhiko Kodama

Abstract

In Japan, there has been a gradual increase in cases of non-viral chronic liver diseases, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), occurring with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). First, a national survey investigating the etiology of HCC in Japan was performed. Among HCCs based on non-viral disease, alcoholic liver disease with HCC accounted for 7.2% of all HCCs, followed by chronic liver disease of unknown etiology with HCC (5.1%) and NAFLD with HCC (2.0%). The clinical characteristics of these three HCC groups were clearly different. In our second analysis, the HCC development rates among liver cirrhosis with NAFLD, alcoholic cirrhosis, and cirrhosis with hepatitis C virus (HCV) were compared. HCC development rates were 11.3%/5 years in NAFLD cirrhosis, 30.5%/5 years in HCV cirrhosis, and 12.5%/5 years in alcoholic cirrhosis, suggesting that the hepatocarcinogenesis in NAFLD and alcoholic liver disease were similar but were lower than that in HCV. Using Cox hazards analysis, older age, higher serum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase level, and higher Child-Pugh score as risk factors of HCC were identified. Finally, clinical data of NAFLD-HCC with the data for HCC with HCV (HCV-HCC) were compared. The percentage of NAFLD-HCC patients with des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin-positive was higher than that with α-fetoprotein-positive. The 5-year survival and recurrence rates for NAFLD-HCC were almost similar to those for HCV-HCC. In Asian countries, the prevalence of NAFLD is increasing. Therefore, elucidating the pathogenesis and clinical features of HCC in patients with NAFLD is indeed an urgent problem.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 20%
Student > Postgraduate 4 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 16%
Student > Master 3 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 5 20%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 56%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Unspecified 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 4 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2013.
All research outputs
#2,838,219
of 12,353,349 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology
#354
of 1,631 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,450
of 211,847 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology
#17
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,353,349 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,631 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,847 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.