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The health worker recruitment and deployment process in Kenya: an emergency hiring program

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, September 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
142 Mendeley
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Title
The health worker recruitment and deployment process in Kenya: an emergency hiring program
Published in
Human Resources for Health, September 2008
DOI 10.1186/1478-4491-6-19
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ummuro Adano

Abstract

Despite a pool of unemployed health staff available in Kenya, staffing levels at most facilities were only 50%, and maldistribution of staff left many people without access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Because in the current system it takes one to two years to fill vacant positions, even when funding is available, an emergency approach was needed to fast-track the hiring and deployment process. A stakeholder group was formed to bring together leaders from several sectors to design and implement a fast-track hiring and deployment model that would mobilize 830 additional health workers. This model used the private sector to recruit and deploy new health workers and manage the payroll and employment contracts, with an agreement from the government to transfer these staff to the government payroll after three years. The recruitment process was shortened to less than three months. By providing job orientation and on-time pay checks, the program increased employee retention and satisfaction. Most of the active roadblocks to changes in the health workforce policies and systems are 'human' and not technical, stemming from a lack of leadership, a problem-solving mindset and the alignment of stakeholders from several sectors. It is essential to establish partnerships and foster commitment and collaboration to create needed change in human resource management (HRM). Strengthening appointment on merit is one of the most powerful, yet simplest ways in which the health sector and governments that seek to tackle the challenges of corruption and poor governance can improve their image and efficiency. The quality and integrity of the public health sector can be improved only through professionalizing HRM, reformulating and consolidating the currently fragmented HR functions, and bringing all the pieces together under the authority and influence of HR departments and units with expanded scopes. HR staff must be specialists with strategic HR functions and not generalists who are confined to playing a restricted and bureaucratic role.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 142 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 2 1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Mozambique 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Thailand 1 <1%
Unknown 135 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 57 40%
Researcher 18 13%
Student > Postgraduate 17 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 8%
Student > Bachelor 11 8%
Other 21 15%
Unknown 6 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 49 35%
Social Sciences 18 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 16 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 10%
Other 19 13%
Unknown 11 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2017.
All research outputs
#840,798
of 12,083,996 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#89
of 641 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,183
of 202,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#5
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,083,996 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 641 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 202,663 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.