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Oxytocin enhances brain reward system responses in men viewing the face of their female partner

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
41 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
572 tweeters
facebook
17 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
259 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
407 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Oxytocin enhances brain reward system responses in men viewing the face of their female partner
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2013
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1314190110
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dirk Scheele, Andrea Wille, Keith M. Kendrick, Birgit Stoffel-Wagner, Benjamin Becker, Onur Güntürkün, Wolfgang Maier, René Hurlemann

Abstract

The biological mechanisms underlying long-term partner bonds in humans are unclear. The evolutionarily conserved neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) is associated with the formation of partner bonds in some species via interactions with brain dopamine reward systems. However, whether it plays a similar role in humans has as yet not been established. Here, we report the results of a discovery and a replication study, each involving a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject, pharmaco-functional MRI experiment with 20 heterosexual pair-bonded male volunteers. In both experiments, intranasal OXT treatment (24 IU) made subjects perceive their female partner's face as more attractive compared with unfamiliar women but had no effect on the attractiveness of other familiar women. This enhanced positive partner bias was paralleled by an increased response to partner stimuli compared with unfamiliar women in brain reward regions including the ventral tegmental area and the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). In the left NAcc, OXT even augmented the neural response to the partner compared with a familiar woman, indicating that this finding is partner-bond specific rather than due to familiarity. Taken together, our results suggest that OXT could contribute to romantic bonds in men by enhancing their partner's attractiveness and reward value compared with other women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 572 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 407 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 1%
Germany 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 389 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 111 27%
Student > Bachelor 57 14%
Researcher 53 13%
Student > Master 33 8%
Professor 25 6%
Other 86 21%
Unknown 42 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 137 34%
Neuroscience 69 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 64 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 3%
Other 43 11%
Unknown 60 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 707. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2022.
All research outputs
#21,499
of 21,753,060 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#674
of 96,502 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154
of 306,152 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4
of 945 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,753,060 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 96,502 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 306,152 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 945 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.