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Relationship between working‐memory network function and substance use: a 3‐year longitudinal fMRI study in heavy cannabis users and controls

Overview of attention for article published in Addiction Biology, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#32 of 658)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
33 tweeters
facebook
15 Facebook pages
reddit
3 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
94 Mendeley
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Title
Relationship between working‐memory network function and substance use: a 3‐year longitudinal fMRI study in heavy cannabis users and controls
Published in
Addiction Biology, January 2013
DOI 10.1111/adb.12111
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cousijn, Janna, Vingerhoets, Wilhelmina A. M., Koenders, Laura, de Haan, Lieuwe, van den Brink, Wim, Wiers, Reinout W., Goudriaan, Anna E., Janna Cousijn, Wilhelmina A. M. Vingerhoets, Laura Koenders, Lieuwe de Haan, Wim van den Brink, Reinout W. Wiers, Anna E. Goudriaan

Abstract

Deficient executive functions play an important role in the development of addiction. Working-memory may therefore be a powerful predictor of the course of drug use, but chronic substance use may also impair working-memory. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal neuro-imaging study was to investigate the relationship between substance use (e.g. alcohol, cannabis, nicotine, illegal psychotropic drugs) and working-memory network function over time in heavy cannabis users and controls. Forty-nine participants performed an n-back working-memory task at baseline and at 3-year follow-up. At follow-up, there were 22 current heavy cannabis users, 4 abstinent heavy cannabis users and 23 non-cannabis-using controls. Tensor-independent component analysis (Tensor-ICA) was used to investigate individual differences in working-memory network functionality over time. Within the group of cannabis users, cannabis-related problems remained stable, whereas alcohol-related problems, nicotine dependence and illegal psychotropic substance use increased over time. At both measurements, behavioral performance and network functionality during the n-back task did not differ between heavy cannabis users and controls. Although n-back accuracy improved, working-memory network function remained stable over time. Within the group of cannabis users, working-memory network functionality was not associated with substance use. These results suggest that sustained moderate to heavy levels of cannabis, nicotine, alcohol and illegal psychotropic substance use do not change working-memory network functionality. Moreover, baseline network functionality did not predict cannabis use and related problems three years later, warranting longitudinal studies in more chronic or dependent cannabis users.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Unknown 87 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 16%
Student > Bachelor 14 15%
Researcher 12 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 11%
Other 26 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 39 41%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 16%
Neuroscience 10 11%
Unspecified 8 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 9%
Other 14 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2018.
All research outputs
#377,393
of 11,423,850 outputs
Outputs from Addiction Biology
#32
of 658 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,938
of 188,828 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Addiction Biology
#1
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,423,850 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 658 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,828 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.