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Differential Effects of Antibiotic Therapy on the Structure and Function of Human Gut Microbiota

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
29 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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82 Dimensions

Readers on

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184 Mendeley
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Title
Differential Effects of Antibiotic Therapy on the Structure and Function of Human Gut Microbiota
Published in
PLoS ONE, November 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0080201
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ana Elena Pérez-Cobas, Alejandro Artacho, Henrik Knecht, María Loreto Ferrús, Anette Friedrichs, Stephan J. Ott, Andrés Moya, Amparo Latorre, María José Gosalbes

Abstract

The human intestinal microbiota performs many essential functions for the host. Antimicrobial agents, such as antibiotics (AB), are also known to disturb microbial community equilibrium, thereby having an impact on human physiology. While an increasing number of studies investigate the effects of AB usage on changes in human gut microbiota biodiversity, its functional effects are still poorly understood. We performed a follow-up study to explore the effect of ABs with different modes of action on human gut microbiota composition and function. Four individuals were treated with different antibiotics and samples were taken before, during and after the AB course for all of them. Changes in the total and in the active (growing) microbiota as well as the functional changes were addressed by 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic 454-based pyrosequencing approaches. We have found that the class of antibiotic, particularly its antimicrobial effect and mode of action, played an important role in modulating the gut microbiota composition and function. Furthermore, analysis of the resistome suggested that oscillatory dynamics are not only due to antibiotic-target resistance, but also to fluctuations in the surviving bacterial community. Our results indicated that the effect of AB on the human gut microbiota relates to the interaction of several factors, principally the properties of the antimicrobial agent, and the structure, functions and resistance genes of the microbial community.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 184 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 2%
Germany 2 1%
United States 2 1%
Spain 2 1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Unknown 171 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 48 26%
Researcher 29 16%
Student > Bachelor 28 15%
Student > Master 27 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 7%
Other 39 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 61 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 23 13%
Unspecified 20 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 18 10%
Other 23 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 September 2015.
All research outputs
#690,206
of 11,345,964 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#13,345
of 126,122 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,847
of 189,813 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#690
of 7,393 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,345,964 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 126,122 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,813 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7,393 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.