↓ Skip to main content

Parental olfactory experience influences behavior and neural structure in subsequent generations

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Neuroscience, December 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 4,516)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

dimensions_citation
643 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
2121 Mendeley
citeulike
7 CiteULike
Title
Parental olfactory experience influences behavior and neural structure in subsequent generations
Published in
Nature Neuroscience, December 2013
DOI 10.1038/nn.3594
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brian G Dias, Kerry J Ressler

Abstract

Using olfactory molecular specificity, we examined the inheritance of parental traumatic exposure, a phenomenon that has been frequently observed, but not understood. We subjected F0 mice to odor fear conditioning before conception and found that subsequently conceived F1 and F2 generations had an increased behavioral sensitivity to the F0-conditioned odor, but not to other odors. When an odor (acetophenone) that activates a known odorant receptor (Olfr151) was used to condition F0 mice, the behavioral sensitivity of the F1 and F2 generations to acetophenone was complemented by an enhanced neuroanatomical representation of the Olfr151 pathway. Bisulfite sequencing of sperm DNA from conditioned F0 males and F1 naive offspring revealed CpG hypomethylation in the Olfr151 gene. In addition, in vitro fertilization, F2 inheritance and cross-fostering revealed that these transgenerational effects are inherited via parental gametes. Our findings provide a framework for addressing how environmental information may be inherited transgenerationally at behavioral, neuroanatomical and epigenetic levels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 811 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2,121 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 49 2%
Germany 18 <1%
Japan 16 <1%
France 12 <1%
Canada 10 <1%
United Kingdom 9 <1%
Spain 6 <1%
Portugal 5 <1%
Netherlands 5 <1%
Other 54 3%
Unknown 1937 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 553 26%
Researcher 374 18%
Student > Bachelor 308 15%
Student > Master 228 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 119 6%
Other 414 20%
Unknown 125 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 906 43%
Neuroscience 227 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 217 10%
Psychology 212 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 149 7%
Other 221 10%
Unknown 189 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1519. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2020.
All research outputs
#2,290
of 15,115,743 outputs
Outputs from Nature Neuroscience
#6
of 4,516 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29
of 259,686 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Neuroscience
#1
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,115,743 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,516 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 42.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,686 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.