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The impact of physical exercise on convergent and divergent thinking

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 7,457)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
28 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
110 tweeters
facebook
36 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
81 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
233 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of physical exercise on convergent and divergent thinking
Published in
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, January 2013
DOI 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00824
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lorenza S. Colzato, Ayca Szapora, Justine N. Pannekoek, Bernhard Hommel

Abstract

Anecdotal literature suggests that creative people sometimes use bodily movement to help overcome mental blocks and lack of inspiration. Several studies have shown that physical exercise may sometimes enhance creative thinking, but the evidence is still inconclusive. In this study we investigated whether creativity in convergent- and divergent-thinking tasks is affected by acute moderate and intense physical exercise in athletes (n = 48) and non-athletes (n = 48). Exercise interfered with divergent thinking in both groups. The impact on convergent thinking, the task that presumably required more cognitive control, depended on the training level: while in non-athletes performance was significantly impaired by exercise, athletes showed a benefit that approached significance. The findings suggest that acute exercise may affect both, divergent and convergent thinking. In particular, it seems to affect control-hungry tasks through exercise-induced "ego-depletion," which however is less pronounced in individuals with higher levels of physical fitness, presumably because of the automatization of movement control, fitness-related neuroenergetic benefits, or both.

Twitter Demographics

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 110 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 233 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 1%
Spain 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 226 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 18%
Student > Bachelor 36 15%
Student > Master 32 14%
Researcher 23 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 5%
Other 44 19%
Unknown 45 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 67 29%
Sports and Recreations 23 10%
Neuroscience 17 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 10 4%
Social Sciences 8 3%
Other 52 22%
Unknown 56 24%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 348. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2023.
All research outputs
#87,224
of 24,330,613 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
#48
of 7,457 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#492
of 289,363 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
#6
of 860 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,330,613 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,457 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,363 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 860 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.