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Management of HIV-associated tuberculosis in resource-limited settings: a state-of-the-art review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
20 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
137 Mendeley
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Title
Management of HIV-associated tuberculosis in resource-limited settings: a state-of-the-art review
Published in
BMC Medicine, December 2013
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-11-253
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephen D Lawn, Graeme Meintjes, Helen McIlleron, Anthony D Harries, Robin Wood

Abstract

The HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB) epidemic remains a huge challenge to public health in resource-limited settings. Reducing the nearly 0.5 million deaths that result each year has been identified as a key priority. Major progress has been made over the past 10 years in defining appropriate strategies and policy guidelines for early diagnosis and effective case management. Ascertainment of cases has been improved through a twofold strategy of provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling in TB patients and intensified TB case finding among those living with HIV. Outcomes of rifampicin-based TB treatment are greatly enhanced by concurrent co-trimoxazole prophylaxis and antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART reduces mortality across a spectrum of CD4 counts and randomized controlled trials have defined the optimum time to start ART. Good outcomes can be achieved when combining TB treatment with first-line ART, but use with second-line ART remains challenging due to pharmacokinetic drug interactions and cotoxicity. We review the frequency and spectrum of adverse drug reactions and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) resulting from combined treatment, and highlight the challenges of managing HIV-associated drug-resistant TB.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 137 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 2 1%
Spain 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 130 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 34 25%
Student > Master 26 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 9%
Other 9 7%
Other 35 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 75 55%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 7%
Unspecified 10 7%
Social Sciences 8 6%
Other 21 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2016.
All research outputs
#940,345
of 13,526,911 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#762
of 2,143 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,104
of 251,480 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#120
of 267 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,526,911 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,143 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,480 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 267 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.