↓ Skip to main content

Inequalities in health care utilization for common childhood illnesses in Ethiopia: evidence from the 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Equity in Health, April 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Inequalities in health care utilization for common childhood illnesses in Ethiopia: evidence from the 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey
Published in
International Journal for Equity in Health, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12939-017-0561-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Asmamaw Atnafu Ayalneh, Dagnachew Muluye Fetene, Tae Jin Lee

Abstract

Globally, 5.9 million children under the age of five died in 2015. More than half and almost one-third of those deaths occurred in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, respectively. Diarrhea and Pneumonia, which were the major causes of the problem, accounted for more than two million deaths of the world's youngest children every year. Like other developing countries, child health services utilization is low in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to identify the determinant factors for the inequalities in medical treatment seeking behavior for common childhood illnesses in Ethiopia. Data were obtained from the Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS) 2011. All children who had diarrhea, cough, and fever in the 2 weeks preceding the survey were included. A total of 1620 children with diarrhea, 2082 with fever, and 2134 with cough were included in the analyses. Multivariate logistic regression with a 95% confidence interval, adjusted odds-ratio, and a P < 0.05 were used to determine the independent effect of each variable. Household wealth-status, maternal and paternal education, and religion were found to be associated with the inequality in the use of child health services. Respondents from households with the richest, richer, and middle wealth status had higher odds of seeking medical treatment for childhood diarrhea, cough, and fever than that of the poorest ones. Maternal and paternal educational status was also associated with medical treatment seeking behavior for childhood diarrhea and fever, respectively. Household wealth and educational status of parents were possible determinant factors for the inequalities observed in health care seeking behavior. Policy interventions aimed at improving the appropriate medical treatment seeking behavior for common childhood illnesses are desirable. Practical economic policies aimed at moving those in the lower wealth quintile are essential to bridge the gap between the rich and the poor. Studies comprising qualitative and quantitative methods are recommended to further explore other determinants of health care utilization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Bangladesh 1 1%
Unknown 77 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 32%
Researcher 8 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Other 5 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 15 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 19%
Social Sciences 8 10%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 7 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 17 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2017.
All research outputs
#8,484,948
of 9,725,367 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Equity in Health
#777
of 828 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#218,506
of 261,404 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Equity in Health
#26
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,725,367 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 828 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,404 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.