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Effect of a 16-week Bikram yoga program on heart rate variability and associated cardiovascular disease risk factors in stressed and sedentary adults: A randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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154 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of a 16-week Bikram yoga program on heart rate variability and associated cardiovascular disease risk factors in stressed and sedentary adults: A randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12906-017-1740-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zoe L. Hewett, Kate L. Pumpa, Caroline A. Smith, Paul P. Fahey, Birinder S. Cheema

Abstract

Chronic activation of the stress-response can contribute to cardiovascular disease risk, particularly in sedentary individuals. This study investigated the effect of a Bikram yoga intervention on the high frequency power component of heart rate variability (HRV) and associated cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (i.e. additional domains of HRV, hemodynamic, hematologic, anthropometric and body composition outcome measures) in stressed and sedentary adults. Eligible adults were randomized to an experimental group (n = 29) or a no treatment control group (n = 34). Experimental group participants were instructed to attend three to five supervised Bikram yoga classes per week for 16 weeks at local studios. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline (week 0) and completion (week 17). Sixty-three adults (37.2 ± 10.8 years, 79% women) were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. The experimental group attended 27 ± 18 classes. Analyses of covariance revealed no significant change in the high-frequency component of HRV (p = 0.912, partial η (2) = 0.000) or in any secondary outcome measure between groups over time. However, regression analyses revealed that higher attendance in the experimental group was associated with significant reductions in diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.039; partial η (2) = 0.154), body fat percentage (p = 0.001, partial η (2) = 0.379), fat mass (p = 0.003, partial η (2) = 0.294) and body mass index (p = 0.05, partial η (2) = 0.139). A 16-week Bikram yoga program did not increase the high frequency power component of HRV or any other CVD risk factors investigated. As revealed by post hoc analyses, low adherence likely contributed to the null effects. Future studies are required to address barriers to adherence to better elucidate the dose-response effects of Bikram yoga practice as a medium to lower stress-related CVD risk. Retrospectively registered with Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12616000867493 . Registered 04 July 2016.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 154 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 154 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 32 21%
Student > Master 26 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 11%
Researcher 15 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 9%
Other 25 16%
Unknown 25 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 22%
Psychology 17 11%
Sports and Recreations 15 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Other 17 11%
Unknown 31 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2017.
All research outputs
#4,122,818
of 14,574,779 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#825
of 2,947 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,321
of 265,197 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,574,779 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,947 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,197 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them