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Bacteriophage Orphan DNA Methyltransferases: Insights from Their Bacterial Origin, Function, and Occurrence

Overview of attention for article published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, October 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
patent
1 patent
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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106 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
186 Mendeley
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Title
Bacteriophage Orphan DNA Methyltransferases: Insights from Their Bacterial Origin, Function, and Occurrence
Published in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, October 2013
DOI 10.1128/aem.02229-13
Pubmed ID
Authors

James Murphy, Jennifer Mahony, Stuart Ainsworth, Arjen Nauta, Douwe van Sinderen

Abstract

Type II DNA methyltransferases (MTases) are enzymes found ubiquitously in the prokaryotic world, where they play important roles in several cellular processes, such as host protection and epigenetic regulation. Three classes of type II MTases have been identified thus far in bacteria which function in transferring a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to a target nucleotide base, forming N-6-methyladenine (class I), N-4-methylcytosine (class II), or C-5-methylcytosine (class III). Often, these MTases are associated with a cognate restriction endonuclease (REase) to form a restriction-modification (R-M) system protecting bacterial cells from invasion by foreign DNA. When MTases exist alone, which are then termed orphan MTases, they are believed to be mainly involved in regulatory activities in the bacterial cell. Genomes of various lytic and lysogenic phages have been shown to encode multi- and mono-specific orphan MTases that have the ability to confer protection from restriction endonucleases of their bacterial host(s). The ability of a phage to overcome R-M and other phage-targeting resistance systems can be detrimental to particular biotechnological processes such as dairy fermentations. Conversely, as phages may also be beneficial in certain areas such as phage therapy, phages with additional resistance to host defenses may prolong the effectiveness of the therapy. This minireview will focus on bacteriophage-encoded MTases, their prevalence and diversity, as well as their potential origin and function.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 186 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 182 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 45 24%
Student > Bachelor 32 17%
Student > Master 26 14%
Researcher 23 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 6%
Other 25 13%
Unknown 24 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 60 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 31%
Immunology and Microbiology 14 8%
Environmental Science 6 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 3%
Other 13 7%
Unknown 30 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2021.
All research outputs
#3,164,609
of 19,311,167 outputs
Outputs from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#2,936
of 16,291 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,736
of 287,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#26
of 152 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,311,167 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,291 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,189 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 152 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.