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Short message service (SMS)-based intervention targeting alcohol consumption among university students: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
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Title
Short message service (SMS)-based intervention targeting alcohol consumption among university students: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial
Published in
Trials, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13063-017-1898-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kristin Thomas, Marcus Bendtsen, Catharina Linderoth, Nadine Karlsson, Preben Bendtsen, Ulrika Müssener, Kristin Thomas, Marcus Bendtsen, Catharina Linderoth, Nadine Karlsson, Preben Bendtsen, Ulrika Müssener

Abstract

Despite significant health risks, heavy drinking of alcohol among university students is a widespread problem; excessive drinking is part of the social norm. A growing number of studies indicate that short message service (SMS)-based interventions are cost-effective, accessible, require limited effort by users, and can enable continuous, real-time, brief support in real-world settings. Although there is emerging evidence for the effect of SMS-based interventions in reducing alcohol consumption, more research is needed. This study aims to test the effectiveness of a newly developed SMS-based intervention targeting excessive alcohol consumption among university and college students in Sweden. The study is a two-arm randomized controlled trial with an intervention (SMS programme) and a control (treatment as usual) group. Outcome measures will be investigated at baseline and at 3-month follow up. The primary outcome is total weekly alcohol consumption. Secondary outcomes are frequency of heavy episodic drinking, highest estimated blood alcohol concentration and number of negative consequences due to excessive drinking. This study contributes knowledge on the effect of automatized SMS support to reduce excessive drinking among students compared with existing support such as Student Health Centres. ISRCTN.com, ISRCTN95054707 . Registered on 31 August 2016.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 7 39%
Researcher 6 33%
Student > Master 3 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 28%
Social Sciences 2 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Computer Science 1 6%
Other 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,982,246
of 9,725,367 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#822
of 2,613 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,515
of 261,402 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#32
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,725,367 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,613 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,402 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.