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Enhanced thermal imaging of wound tissue for better clinical decision making

Overview of attention for article published in Physiological Measurement, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Enhanced thermal imaging of wound tissue for better clinical decision making
Published in
Physiological Measurement, May 2017
DOI 10.1088/1361-6579/aa6ea0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ellen Keenan, Georgina Gethin, Louisa Flynn, David Watterson, Gerard M O’Connor

Abstract

Infrared cameras are becoming increasingly popular in clinical applications as they allow fast, non-contact temperature measurements. As abnormal heat distribution can indicate illness, infrared cameras have been applied in the prediction, diagnosis and monitoring of conditions (Lahiri, Bagavathiappan, Jayakumar, & Philip, 2012). Current practices, however, often overlook the importance of emissivity when taking thermal measurements. The consensus is that human skin has an emissivity of 0.98 (Soerensen et al., 2014) but this value varies between individuals, areas examined and whether the skin is damaged. In particular, further research should be conducted on the emissivity variations of wounds. This research investigated the emissivity variation of chronic wounds and its effect on thermal measurements. Eleven patients with non-infected foot ulcers were recruited. Three non-diabetic wounds were also investigated. A reflectance based method was used which involved alternating shades at different temperatures over the region of interest. Based on the change in the thermal images, emissivity was calculated at each pixel. Overall, it was found that the emissivity of wounds was similar or slightly higher to intact skin (range 0.01 - 0.03 higher with an average value of 0.97 ± 0.03), with lower values at wound edges (on average 0.02 lower than intact skin). Correcting for emissivity resulted in an average temperature difference of 0.83% in the thermal images. Despite the similarity in emissivity, the difference between the original thermal image and the emissivity corrected thermal image in some cases was substantial. These differences could prove significant in clinical evaluations, indicating the need to incorporate emissivity measurement into standard protocol to ensure utmost accuracy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 18%
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 10 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 5 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 10%
Engineering 3 8%
Sports and Recreations 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 17 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 May 2017.
All research outputs
#2,761,121
of 10,799,478 outputs
Outputs from Physiological Measurement
#133
of 712 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,971
of 262,813 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Physiological Measurement
#5
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,799,478 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 712 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,813 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.