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Human infectious disease burdens decrease with urbanization but not with biodiversity

Overview of attention for article published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
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Title
Human infectious disease burdens decrease with urbanization but not with biodiversity
Published in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, April 2017
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2016.0122
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chelsea L. Wood, Alex McInturff, Hillary S. Young, DoHyung Kim, Kevin D. Lafferty

Abstract

Infectious disease burdens vary from country to country and year to year due to ecological and economic drivers. Recently, Murray et al. (Murray CJ et al 2012 Lancet380, 2197-2223. (doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61689-4)) estimated country-level morbidity and mortality associated with a variety of factors, including infectious diseases, for the years 1990 and 2010. Unlike other databases that report disease prevalence or count outbreaks per country, Murray et al. report health impacts in per-person disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), allowing comparison across diseases with lethal and sublethal health effects. We investigated the spatial and temporal relationships between DALYs lost to infectious disease and potential demographic, economic, environmental and biotic drivers, for the 60 intermediate-sized countries where data were available and comparable. Most drivers had unique associations with each disease. For example, temperature was positively associated with some diseases and negatively associated with others, perhaps due to differences in disease agent thermal optima, transmission modes and host species identities. Biodiverse countries tended to have high disease burdens, consistent with the expectation that high diversity of potential hosts should support high disease transmission. Contrary to the dilution effect hypothesis, increases in biodiversity over time were not correlated with improvements in human health, and increases in forestation over time were actually associated with increased disease burden. Urbanization and wealth were associated with lower burdens for many diseases, a pattern that could arise from increased access to sanitation and healthcare in cities and increased investment in healthcare. The importance of urbanization and wealth helps to explain why most infectious diseases have become less burdensome over the past three decades, and points to possible levers for further progress in improving global public health.This article is part of the themed issue 'Conservation, biodiversity and infectious disease: scientific evidence and policy implications'.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 78 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 30%
Researcher 17 22%
Student > Master 12 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 12 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 49%
Environmental Science 16 20%
Unspecified 8 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 4%
Other 10 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 71. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2017.
All research outputs
#202,142
of 12,367,469 outputs
Outputs from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#156
of 4,635 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,671
of 267,461 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#6
of 94 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,367,469 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,635 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,461 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 94 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.