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The effect of protein timing on muscle strength and hypertrophy: a meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 693)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Citations

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72 Dimensions

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683 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
The effect of protein timing on muscle strength and hypertrophy: a meta-analysis
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, December 2013
DOI 10.1186/1550-2783-10-53
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brad Jon Schoenfeld, Alan Albert Aragon, James W Krieger

Abstract

Protein timing is a popular dietary strategy designed to optimize the adaptive response to exercise. The strategy involves consuming protein in and around a training session in an effort to facilitate muscular repair and remodeling, and thereby enhance post-exercise strength- and hypertrophy-related adaptations. Despite the apparent biological plausibility of the strategy, however, the effectiveness of protein timing in chronic training studies has been decidedly mixed. The purpose of this paper therefore was to conduct a multi-level meta-regression of randomized controlled trials to determine whether protein timing is a viable strategy for enhancing post-exercise muscular adaptations. The strength analysis comprised 478 subjects and 96 ESs, nested within 41 treatment or control groups and 20 studies. The hypertrophy analysis comprised 525 subjects and 132 ESs, nested with 47 treatment or control groups and 23 studies. A simple pooled analysis of protein timing without controlling for covariates showed a small to moderate effect on muscle hypertrophy with no significant effect found on muscle strength. In the full meta-regression model controlling for all covariates, however, no significant differences were found between treatment and control for strength or hypertrophy. The reduced model was not significantly different from the full model for either strength or hypertrophy. With respect to hypertrophy, total protein intake was the strongest predictor of ES magnitude. These results refute the commonly held belief that the timing of protein intake in and around a training session is critical to muscular adaptations and indicate that consuming adequate protein in combination with resistance exercise is the key factor for maximizing muscle protein accretion.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 569 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 683 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 8 1%
Spain 3 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
United States 3 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Denmark 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Norway 2 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Other 9 1%
Unknown 648 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 168 25%
Student > Bachelor 164 24%
Student > Postgraduate 68 10%
Researcher 64 9%
Other 63 9%
Other 156 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 258 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 132 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 97 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 73 11%
Unspecified 42 6%
Other 81 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 714. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2019.
All research outputs
#8,396
of 13,771,277 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#4
of 693 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119
of 252,415 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#2
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,771,277 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 693 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,415 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.