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Assessing “Dangerous Climate Change”: Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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330 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
878 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
Title
Assessing “Dangerous Climate Change”: Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature
Published in
PLoS ONE, December 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0081648
Pubmed ID
Authors

James Hansen, Pushker Kharecha, Makiko Sato, Valerie Masson-Delmotte, Frank Ackerman, David J. Beerling, Paul J. Hearty, Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Shi-Ling Hsu, Camille Parmesan, Johan Rockstrom, Eelco J. Rohling, Jeffrey Sachs, Pete Smith, Konrad Steffen, Lise Van Susteren, Karina von Schuckmann, James C. Zachos

Abstract

We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth's measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today's young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of ∼500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of ∼1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2°C global warming, would spur "slow" feedbacks and eventual warming of 3-4°C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth's energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 658 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 878 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 14 2%
United Kingdom 11 1%
Germany 4 <1%
Brazil 3 <1%
Italy 3 <1%
France 3 <1%
South Africa 3 <1%
Chile 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Other 25 3%
Unknown 808 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 176 20%
Student > Master 149 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 142 16%
Student > Bachelor 110 13%
Other 47 5%
Other 165 19%
Unknown 89 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 184 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 136 15%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 106 12%
Engineering 64 7%
Social Sciences 57 6%
Other 204 23%
Unknown 127 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1130. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2021.
All research outputs
#6,441
of 17,651,001 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#84
of 166,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51
of 273,947 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#8
of 7,375 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,651,001 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 166,085 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,947 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7,375 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.