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Assessing and adjusting for non-response in the Millennium Cohort Family Study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Research Methodology, January 2017
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Title
Assessing and adjusting for non-response in the Millennium Cohort Family Study
Published in
BMC Medical Research Methodology, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12874-017-0294-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nida H. Corry, Christianna S. Williams, Mike Battaglia, Hope Seib McMaster, Valerie A. Stander

Abstract

In conducting population-based surveys, it is important to thoroughly examine and adjust for potential non-response bias to improve the representativeness of the sample prior to conducting analyses of the data and reporting findings. This paper examines factors contributing to second stage survey non-response during the baseline data collection for the Millennium Cohort Family Study, a large longitudinal study of US service members and their spouses from all branches of the military. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to develop a comprehensive response propensity model. Results showed the majority of service member sociodemographic, military, and administrative variables were significantly associated with non-response, along with various health behaviours, mental health indices, and financial and social issues. However, effects were quite small for many factors, with a few demographic and survey administrative variables accounting for the most substantial variance. The Millennium Cohort Family Study was impacted by a number of non-response factors that commonly affect survey research. In particular, recruitment of young, male, and minority populations, as well as junior ranking personnel, was challenging. Despite this, our results suggest the success of representative population sampling can be effectively augmented through targeted oversampling and recruitment, as well as a comprehensive survey weighting strategy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 20%
Student > Master 5 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 16%
Lecturer 3 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Other 5 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 28%
Social Sciences 3 12%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 6 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2017.
All research outputs
#5,206,866
of 9,724,738 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#601
of 939 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#134,789
of 261,474 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#21
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,724,738 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 939 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,474 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.