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Variation in species-level plant functional traits over wetland indicator status categories

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

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2 news outlets

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Variation in species-level plant functional traits over wetland indicator status categories
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, April 2017
DOI 10.1002/ece3.2975
Pubmed ID
Authors

Miles E. McCoy-Sulentic, Thomas E. Kolb, David M. Merritt, Emily C. Palmquist, Barbara E. Ralston, Daniel A. Sarr

Abstract

Wetland indicator status (WIS) describes the habitat affinity of plant species and is used in wetland delineations and resource inventories. Understanding how species-level functional traits vary across WIS categories may improve designations, elucidate mechanisms of adaptation, and explain habitat optima and niche. We investigated differences in species-level traits of riparian flora across WIS categories, extending their application to indicate hydrologic habitat. We measured or compiled data on specific leaf area (SLA), stem specific gravity (SSG), seed mass, and mature height of 110 plant species that occur along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona. Additionally, we measured leaf δ(13)C, δ(15)N, % carbon, % nitrogen, and C/N ratio of 56 species with C3 photosynthesis. We asked the following: (i) How do species-level traits vary over WIS categories? (ii) Does the pattern differ between herbaceous and woody species? (iii) How well do multivariate traits define WIS categories? (iv) Which traits are correlated? The largest trait differences among WIS categories for herbaceous species occurred for SSG, seed mass, % leaf carbon and height, and for woody species occurred for height, SSG, and δ(13)C. SSG increased and height decreased with habitat aridity for both woody and herbaceous species. The δ(13)C and hence water use efficiency of woody species increased with habitat aridity. Water use efficiency of herbaceous species increased with habitat aridity via greater occurrence of C4 grasses. Multivariate trait assemblages differed among WIS categories. Over all species, SLA was correlated with height, δ(13)C, % leaf N, and C/N; height was correlated with SSG and % leaf C; SSG was correlated with % leaf C. Adaptations of both herbaceous and woody riparian species to wet, frequently inundated habitats include low-density stem tissue. Adaptations to drier habitats in the riparian zone include short, high-density cavitation-resistant stem tissue, and high water use efficiency. The results enhance understanding about using traits to describe plant habitat in riparian systems.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 47 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 27%
Researcher 8 17%
Unspecified 7 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Other 9 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 40%
Environmental Science 16 33%
Unspecified 8 17%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 4%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 2 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,394,270
of 13,538,431 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#763
of 4,038 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,313
of 264,967 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#45
of 194 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,538,431 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,038 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,967 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 194 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.