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A global survey of changing patterns of food allergy burden in children

Overview of attention for article published in World Allergy Organization Journal, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 617)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
62 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
295 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
422 Mendeley
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Title
A global survey of changing patterns of food allergy burden in children
Published in
World Allergy Organization Journal, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1939-4551-6-21
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan L Prescott, Ruby Pawankar, Katrina J Allen, Dianne E Campbell, John KH Sinn, Alessandro Fiocchi, Motohiro Ebisawa, Hugh A Sampson, Kirsten Beyer, Bee-Wah Lee

Abstract

While food allergies and eczema are among the most common chronic non-communicable diseases in children in many countries worldwide, quality data on the burden of these diseases is lacking, particularly in developing countries. This 2012 survey was performed to collect information on existing data on the global patterns and prevalence of food allergy by surveying all the national member societies of the World Allergy Organization, and some of their neighbouring countries. Data were collected from 89 countries, including published data, and changes in the health care burden of food allergy. More than half of the countries surveyed (52/89) did not have any data on food allergy prevalence. Only 10% (9/89) of countries had accurate food allergy prevalence data, based on oral food challenges (OFC). The remaining countries (23/89) had data largely based on parent-reporting of a food allergy diagnosis or symptoms, which is recognised to overestimate the prevalence of food allergy. Based on more accurate measures, the prevalence of clinical (OFC proven) food allergy in preschool children in developed countries is now as high as 10%. In large and rapidly emerging societies of Asia, such as China, where there are documented increases in food allergy, the prevalence of OFC-proven food allergy is now around 7% in pre-schoolers, comparable to the reported prevalence in European regions. While food allergy appears to be increasing in both developed and developing countries in the last 10-15 years, there is a lack of quality comparative data. This survey also highlights inequities in paediatric allergy services, availability of adrenaline auto-injectors and standardised National Anaphylaxis Action plans. In conclusion, there remains a need to gather more accurate data on the prevalence of food allergy in many developed and developing countries to better anticipate and address the rising community and health service burden of food allergy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 62 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 422 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Vietnam 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 407 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 78 18%
Student > Bachelor 72 17%
Researcher 54 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 49 12%
Other 25 6%
Other 78 18%
Unknown 66 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 115 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 78 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 37 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 28 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 26 6%
Other 63 15%
Unknown 75 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 81. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2020.
All research outputs
#287,034
of 16,311,404 outputs
Outputs from World Allergy Organization Journal
#9
of 617 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,103
of 266,776 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Allergy Organization Journal
#2
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,311,404 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 617 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,776 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.