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Dietary thiols in exercise: oxidative stress defence, exercise performance, and adaptation

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
123 Mendeley
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Title
Dietary thiols in exercise: oxidative stress defence, exercise performance, and adaptation
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12970-017-0168-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yanita McLeay, Stephen Stannard, Stuart Houltham, Carlene Starck

Abstract

Endurance athletes are susceptible to cellular damage initiated by excessive levels of aerobic exercise-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Whilst ROS can contribute to the onset of fatigue, there is increasing evidence that they play a crucial role in exercise adaptations. The use of antioxidant supplements such as vitamin C and E in athletes is common; however, their ability to enhance performance and facilitate recovery is controversial, with many studies suggesting a blunting of training adaptations with supplementation. The up-regulation of endogenous antioxidant systems brought about by exercise training allows for greater tolerance to subsequent ROS, thus, athletes may benefit from increasing these systems through dietary thiol donors. Recent work has shown supplementation with a cysteine donor (N-acetylcysteine; NAC) improves antioxidant capacity by augmenting glutathione levels and reducing markers of oxidative stress, as well as ergogenic potential through association with delayed fatigue in numerous experimental models. However, the use of this, and other thiol donors may have adverse physiological effects. A recent discovery for the use of a thiol donor food source, keratin, to potentially enhance endogenous antioxidants may have important implications for endurance athletes hoping to enhance performance and recovery without blunting training adaptations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 123 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 120 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 14%
Student > Bachelor 16 13%
Researcher 13 11%
Student > Postgraduate 9 7%
Other 33 27%
Unknown 15 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 36 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 6%
Other 14 11%
Unknown 26 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2018.
All research outputs
#5,066,062
of 17,364,317 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#585
of 794 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,563
of 273,353 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,364,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 794 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 50.3. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,353 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them