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Mobile-based intervention intended to stop obesity in preschool-aged children: the MINISTOP randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
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Title
Mobile-based intervention intended to stop obesity in preschool-aged children: the MINISTOP randomized controlled trial
Published in
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, April 2017
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.116.150995
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nyström, Christine Delisle, Sandin, Sven, Henriksson, Pontus, Henriksson, Hanna, Trolle-Lagerros, Ylva, Larsson, Christel, Maddison, Ralph, Ortega, Francisco B, Pomeroy, Jeremy, Ruiz, Jonatan R, Silfvernagel, Kristin, Timpka, Toomas, Löf, Marie, Christine Delisle Nyström, Sven Sandin, Pontus Henriksson, Hanna Henriksson, Ylva Trolle-Lagerros, Christel Larsson, Ralph Maddison, Francisco B Ortega, Jeremy Pomeroy, Jonatan R Ruiz, Kristin Silfvernagel, Toomas Timpka, Marie Löf

Abstract

Background: Traditional obesity prevention programs are time- and cost-intensive. Mobile phone technology has been successful in changing behaviors and managing weight; however, to our knowledge, its potential in young children has yet to be examined.Objective: We assessed the effectiveness of a mobile health (mHealth) obesity prevention program on body fat, dietary habits, and physical activity in healthy Swedish children aged 4.5 y.Design: From 2014 to 2015, 315 children were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. Parents in the intervention group received a 6-mo mHealth program. The primary outcome was fat mass index (FMI), whereas the secondary outcomes were intakes of fruits, vegetables, candy, and sweetened beverages and time spent sedentary and in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Composite scores for the primary and secondary outcomes were computed.Results: No statistically significant intervention effect was observed for FMI between the intervention and control group (mean ± SD: -0.23 ± 0.56 compared with -0.20 ± 0.49 kg/m(2)). However, the intervention group increased their mean composite score from baseline to follow-up, whereas the control group did not (+0.36 ± 1.47 compared with -0.06 ± 1.33 units; P = 0.021). This improvement was more pronounced among the children with an FMI above the median (4.11 kg/m(2)) (P = 0.019). The odds of increasing the composite score for the 6 dietary and physical activity behaviors were 99% higher for the intervention group than the control group (P = 0.008).Conclusions: This mHealth obesity prevention study in preschool-aged children found no difference between the intervention and control group for FMI. However, the intervention group showed a considerably higher postintervention composite score (a secondary outcome) than the control group, especially in children with a higher FMI. Further studies targeting specific obesity classes within preschool-aged children are warranted. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02021786.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 90 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 24%
Researcher 14 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 12%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Other 22 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 17%
Unspecified 13 14%
Psychology 12 13%
Sports and Recreations 8 9%
Other 21 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2017.
All research outputs
#1,564,815
of 11,435,099 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#3,089
of 8,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,957
of 264,517 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#52
of 117 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,435,099 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,313 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,517 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 117 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.