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The challenges of implementing pathogen control strategies for fishes used in biomedical research

Overview of attention for article published in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, January 2012
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1 tweeter

Citations

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Title
The challenges of implementing pathogen control strategies for fishes used in biomedical research
Published in
Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, January 2012
DOI 10.1016/j.cbpc.2011.06.007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christian Lawrence, Don G. Ennis, Claudia Harper, Michael L. Kent, Katrina Murray, George E. Sanders

Abstract

Over the past several decades, a number of fish species, including the zebrafish, medaka, and platyfish/swordtail, have become important models for human health and disease. Despite the increasing prevalence of these and other fish species in research, methods for health maintenance and the management of diseases in laboratory populations of these animals are underdeveloped. There is a growing realization that this trend must change, especially as the use of these species expands beyond developmental biology and more towards experimental applications where the presence of underlying disease may affect the physiology animals used in experiments and potentially compromise research results. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop, improve, and implement strategies for managing health and disease in aquatic research facilities. The purpose of this review is to report the proceedings of a workshop entitled "Animal Health and Disease Management in Research Animals" that was recently held at the 5th Aquatic Animal Models for Human Disease in September 2010 at Corvallis, Oregon to discuss the challenges involved with moving the field forward on this front.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 22%
Other 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 53%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Sports and Recreations 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2011.
All research outputs
#7,677,921
of 12,288,060 outputs
Outputs from Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology
#187
of 361 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,496
of 87,425 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,288,060 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 361 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 87,425 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.