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Microbiological Reduction of Sb(V) in Anoxic Freshwater Sediments

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, December 2013
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

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52 Mendeley
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Title
Microbiological Reduction of Sb(V) in Anoxic Freshwater Sediments
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, December 2013
DOI 10.1021/es403312j
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas R. Kulp, Laurence G. Miller, Franco Braiotta, Samuel M. Webb, Benjamin D. Kocar, Jodi S. Blum, Ronald S. Oremland

Abstract

Microbiological reduction of millimolar concentrations of Sb(V) to Sb(III) was observed in anoxic sediments from two freshwater settings: (1) a Sb- and As-contaminated mine site (Stibnite Mine) in central Idaho and 2) an uncontaminated suburban lake (Searsville Lake) in the San Francisco Bay Area. Rates of Sb(V) reduction in anoxic sediment microcosms and enrichment cultures were enhanced by amendment with lactate or acetate as electron donors but not by H2, and no reduction occurred in sterilized controls. Addition of 2-(14)C-acetate to Stibnite Mine microcosms resulted in the production of (14)CO2 coupled to Sb(V) reduction, suggesting that this process proceeds by a dissimilatory respiratory pathway in those sediments. Antimony(V) reduction in Searsville Lake sediments was not coupled to acetate mineralization and may be associated with Sb-resistance. The microcosms and enrichment cultures also reduced sulfate, and the precipitation of insoluble Sb(III)-sulfide complexes was a major sink for reduced Sb. The reduction of Sb(V) by Stibnite Mine sediments was inhibited by As(V), suggesting that As(V) is a preferred electron acceptor for the indigenous community. These findings indicate a novel pathway for anaerobic microbiological respiration and suggest that communities capable of reducing high concentrations of Sb(V) commonly occur naturally in the environment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 4%
United States 2 4%
Colombia 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Unknown 46 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 21%
Student > Master 10 19%
Unspecified 9 17%
Researcher 6 12%
Other 4 8%
Other 12 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 16 31%
Environmental Science 13 25%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 10%
Engineering 3 6%
Chemistry 3 6%
Other 12 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 December 2013.
All research outputs
#2,657,079
of 6,642,508 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#3,198
of 5,781 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#58,673
of 159,093 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#125
of 252 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,642,508 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,781 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 159,093 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 252 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.