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Long-Term Relations Among Prosocial-Media Use, Empathy, and Prosocial Behavior

Overview of attention for article published in Psychological Science (Sage Publications Inc.), December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
34 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
58 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
221 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Long-Term Relations Among Prosocial-Media Use, Empathy, and Prosocial Behavior
Published in
Psychological Science (Sage Publications Inc.), December 2013
DOI 10.1177/0956797613503854
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sara Prot, Douglas A. Gentile, Craig A. Anderson, Kanae Suzuki, Edward Swing, Kam Ming Lim, Yukiko Horiuchi, Margareta Jelic, Barbara Krahé, Wei Liuqing, Albert K. Liau, Angeline Khoo, Poesis Diana Petrescu, Akira Sakamoto, Sachi Tajima, Roxana Andreea Toma, Wayne Warburton, Xuemin Zhang, Ben Chun Pan Lam

Abstract

Despite recent growth of research on the effects of prosocial media, processes underlying these effects are not well understood. Two studies explored theoretically relevant mediators and moderators of the effects of prosocial media on helping. Study 1 examined associations among prosocial- and violent-media use, empathy, and helping in samples from seven countries. Prosocial-media use was positively associated with helping. This effect was mediated by empathy and was similar across cultures. Study 2 explored longitudinal relations among prosocial-video-game use, violent-video-game use, empathy, and helping in a large sample of Singaporean children and adolescents measured three times across 2 years. Path analyses showed significant longitudinal effects of prosocial- and violent-video-game use on prosocial behavior through empathy. Latent-growth-curve modeling for the 2-year period revealed that change in video-game use significantly affected change in helping, and that this relationship was mediated by change in empathy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 34 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 221 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 3%
Germany 3 1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 202 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 47 21%
Student > Bachelor 39 18%
Student > Master 33 15%
Researcher 25 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 8%
Other 59 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 119 54%
Social Sciences 27 12%
Unspecified 21 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 10 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 3%
Other 37 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 111. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2016.
All research outputs
#118,584
of 12,356,524 outputs
Outputs from Psychological Science (Sage Publications Inc.)
#529
of 3,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,023
of 221,324 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychological Science (Sage Publications Inc.)
#28
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,356,524 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,446 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 61.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,324 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.