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Decreasing Smoking but Increasing Stigma? Anti-tobacco Campaigns, Public Health, and Cancer Care

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, May 2017
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Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
53 tweeters

Citations

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39 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Decreasing Smoking but Increasing Stigma? Anti-tobacco Campaigns, Public Health, and Cancer Care
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, May 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.5.msoc1-1705
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Public health researchers, mental health clinicians, philosophers, and medical ethicists have questioned whether the public health benefits of large-scale anti-tobacco campaigns are justified in light of the potential for exacerbating stigma toward patients diagnosed with lung cancer. Although there is strong evidence for the public health benefits of anti-tobacco campaigns, there is a growing appreciation for the need to better attend to the unintended consequence of lung cancer stigma. We argue that there is an ethical burden for creators of public health campaigns to consider lung cancer stigma in the development and dissemination of hard-hitting anti-tobacco campaigns. We also contend that health care professionals have an ethical responsibility to try to mitigate stigmatizing messages of public health campaigns with empathic patient-clinician communication during clinical encounters.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 53 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 50 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 24%
Student > Bachelor 10 20%
Researcher 7 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 8%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 6 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 20%
Social Sciences 8 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 8 16%