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Hyperdopaminergia and NMDA Receptor Hypofunction Disrupt Neural Phase Signaling

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroscience, June 2009
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Title
Hyperdopaminergia and NMDA Receptor Hypofunction Disrupt Neural Phase Signaling
Published in
Journal of Neuroscience, June 2009
DOI 10.1523/jneurosci.1773-09.2009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kafui Dzirasa, Amy J. Ramsey, Daniel Yasumasa Takahashi, Jennifer Stapleton, Juan M. Potes, Jamila K. Williams, Raul R. Gainetdinov, Koichi Sameshima, Marc G. Caron, Miguel A. L. Nicolelis, Dzirasa K, Ramsey AJ, Takahashi DY, Stapleton J, Potes JM, Williams JK, Gainetdinov RR, Sameshima K, Caron MG, Nicolelis MA, K. Dzirasa, A. J. Ramsey, D. Y. Takahashi, J. Stapleton, J. M. Potes, J. K. Williams, R. R. Gainetdinov, K. Sameshima, M. G. Caron, M. A. L. Nicolelis

Abstract

Neural phase signaling has gained attention as a putative coding mechanism through which the brain binds the activity of neurons across distributed brain areas to generate thoughts, percepts, and behaviors. Neural phase signaling has been shown to play a role in various cognitive processes, and it has been suggested that altered phase signaling may play a role in mediating the cognitive deficits observed across neuropsychiatric illness. Here, we investigated neural phase signaling in two mouse models of cognitive dysfunction: mice with genetically induced hyperdopaminergia [dopamine transporter knock-out (DAT-KO) mice] and mice with genetically induced NMDA receptor hypofunction [NMDA receptor subunit-1 knockdown (NR1-KD) mice]. Cognitive function in these mice was assessed using a radial-arm maze task, and local field potentials were recorded from dorsal hippocampus and prefrontal cortex as DAT-KO mice, NR1-KD mice, and their littermate controls engaged in behavioral exploration. Our results demonstrate that both DAT-KO and NR1-KD mice display deficits in spatial cognitive performance. Moreover, we show that persistent hyperdopaminergia alters interstructural phase signaling, whereas NMDA receptor hypofunction alters interstructural and intrastructural phase signaling. These results demonstrate that dopamine and NMDA receptor dependent glutamate signaling play a critical role in coordinating neural phase signaling, and encourage further studies to investigate the role that deficits in phase signaling play in mediating cognitive dysfunction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 6%
France 2 2%
Australia 2 2%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 110 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 38 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 24%
Student > Master 11 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 10 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 5%
Other 21 17%
Unknown 10 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 52 41%
Neuroscience 25 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 13%
Psychology 7 6%
Engineering 4 3%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 17 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2016.
All research outputs
#5,309,227
of 7,361,823 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroscience
#9,797
of 11,773 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,550
of 175,145 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroscience
#191
of 250 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,361,823 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,773 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 175,145 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 250 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.