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Cohesin and CTCF differentially affect chromatin architecture and gene expression in human cells

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

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392 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
670 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
Title
Cohesin and CTCF differentially affect chromatin architecture and gene expression in human cells
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, December 2013
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1317788111
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Zuin, J. R. Dixon, M. I. J. A. van der Reijden, Z. Ye, P. Kolovos, R. W. W. Brouwer, M. P. C. van de Corput, H. J. G. van de Werken, T. A. Knoch, W. F. J. van IJcken, F. G. Grosveld, B. Ren, K. S. Wendt

Abstract

Recent studies of genome-wide chromatin interactions have revealed that the human genome is partitioned into many self-associating topological domains. The boundary sequences between domains are enriched for binding sites of CTCC-binding factor (CTCF) and the cohesin complex, implicating these two factors in the establishment or maintenance of topological domains. To determine the role of cohesin and CTCF in higher-order chromatin architecture in human cells, we depleted the cohesin complex or CTCF and examined the consequences of loss of these factors on higher-order chromatin organization, as well as the transcriptome. We observed a general loss of local chromatin interactions upon disruption of cohesin, but the topological domains remain intact. However, we found that depletion of CTCF not only reduced intradomain interactions but also increased interdomain interactions. Furthermore, distinct groups of genes become misregulated upon depletion of cohesin and CTCF. Taken together, these observations suggest that CTCF and cohesin contribute differentially to chromatin organization and gene regulation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 670 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 14 2%
Germany 8 1%
France 5 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Netherlands 3 <1%
Korea, Republic of 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
India 2 <1%
China 2 <1%
Other 7 1%
Unknown 622 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 233 35%
Researcher 135 20%
Student > Master 78 12%
Student > Bachelor 64 10%
Unspecified 45 7%
Other 115 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 311 46%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 226 34%
Unspecified 52 8%
Computer Science 25 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 3%
Other 37 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 June 2018.
All research outputs
#2,348,437
of 13,073,426 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#29,552
of 79,340 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,286
of 247,248 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#459
of 953 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,073,426 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,340 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,248 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 953 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.