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Using simple agent-based modeling to inform and enhance neighborhood walkability

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
155 Mendeley
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Title
Using simple agent-based modeling to inform and enhance neighborhood walkability
Published in
International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1476-072x-12-58
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hannah Badland, Marcus White, Gus MacAulay, Serryn Eagleson, Suzanne Mavoa, Christopher Pettit, Billie Giles-Corti

Abstract

Pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods with proximal destinations and services encourage walking and decrease car dependence, thereby contributing to more active and healthier communities. Proximity to key destinations and services is an important aspect of the urban design decision making process, particularly in areas adopting a transit-oriented development (TOD) approach to urban planning, whereby densification occurs within walking distance of transit nodes. Modeling destination access within neighborhoods has been limited to circular catchment buffers or more sophisticated network-buffers generated using geoprocessing routines within geographical information systems (GIS). Both circular and network-buffer catchment methods are problematic. Circular catchment models do not account for street networks, thus do not allow exploratory 'what-if' scenario modeling; and network-buffering functionality typically exists within proprietary GIS software, which can be costly and requires a high level of expertise to operate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 155 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 1%
Turkey 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Thailand 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 147 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 34 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 20%
Researcher 26 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 10%
Student > Postgraduate 9 6%
Other 27 17%
Unknown 13 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 28 18%
Design 16 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 9%
Engineering 14 9%
Environmental Science 12 8%
Other 41 26%
Unknown 30 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 January 2014.
All research outputs
#6,753,137
of 12,545,316 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Health Geographics
#242
of 475 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,213
of 243,521 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Health Geographics
#18
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,545,316 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 475 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,521 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.