↓ Skip to main content

Changes in the hemagglutinin of H5N1 viruses during human infection – Influence on receptor binding

Overview of attention for article published in Virology, December 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
Title
Changes in the hemagglutinin of H5N1 viruses during human infection – Influence on receptor binding
Published in
Virology, December 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.virol.2013.08.010
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martin Crusat, Junfeng Liu, Angelina S Palma, Robert A Childs, Yan Liu, Stephen A Wharton, Yi Pu Lin, Peter J Coombs, Stephen R Martin, Mikhail Matrosovich, Zi Chen, David J Stevens, Vo Minh Hien, Tran Tan Thanh, Le Nguyen Truc Nhu, Lam Anh Nguyet, Do Quang Ha, H Rogier van Doorn, Tran Tinh Hien, Harald S Conradt, Makoto Kiso, Steve J Gamblin, Wengang Chai, John J Skehel, Alan J Hay, Jeremy Farrar, Menno D de Jong, Ten Feizi

Abstract

As avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses continue to circulate in Asia and Africa, global concerns of an imminent pandemic persist. Recent experimental studies suggest that efficient transmission between humans of current H5N1 viruses only requires a few genetic changes. An essential step is alteration of the virus hemagglutinin from preferential binding to avian receptors for the recognition of human receptors present in the upper airway. We have identified receptor-binding changes which emerged during H5N1 infection of humans, due to single amino acid substitutions, Ala134Val and Ile151Phe, in the hemagglutinin. Detailed biological, receptor-binding, and structural analyses revealed reduced binding of the mutated viruses to avian-like receptors, but without commensurate increased binding to the human-like receptors investigated, possibly reflecting a receptor-binding phenotype intermediate in adaptation to more human-like characteristics. These observations emphasize that evolution in nature of avian H5N1 viruses to efficient binding of human receptors is a complex multistep process.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Unknown 22 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 30%
Researcher 5 22%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Other 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 57%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 4%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2014.
All research outputs
#947,533
of 4,507,280 outputs
Outputs from Virology
#241
of 1,582 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,696
of 123,424 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology
#10
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,280 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,582 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 123,424 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.