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Influence of Psychiatric Symptoms on Decisional Capacity in Treatment Refusal

Overview of attention for article published in The AMA Journal of Ethic, May 2017
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57 tweeters

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Title
Influence of Psychiatric Symptoms on Decisional Capacity in Treatment Refusal
Published in
The AMA Journal of Ethic, May 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.5.ecas1-1705
Pubmed ID
Abstract

How psychiatric symptoms affect patients' decision making in practice can inform how we think-theoretically and conceptually-about what it means for those patients to have decision-making capacity. Assessment of a patient's decisional capacity allows those with adequate capacity to make choices regarding treatment and protects those who lack capacity from potential harm caused by impaired decision making. In analyzing a case in which a patient with stage II breast cancer refuses further treatment, we review the conceptual model of informed consent and approaches to assessing decision-making capacity that are in accordance with the American Medical Association Code of Medical Ethics as well as tools to assess decisional capacity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 57 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 4 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 14%
Student > Master 2 10%
Other 5 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 48%
Unspecified 3 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Psychology 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Other 4 19%