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Loss of ecosystem services due to chronic pollution of forests and surface waters in the Adirondack region (USA)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Management, April 2017
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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13 Dimensions

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Loss of ecosystem services due to chronic pollution of forests and surface waters in the Adirondack region (USA)
Published in
Journal of Environmental Management, April 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.12.069
Pubmed ID
Authors

Colin M. Beier, Jesse Caputo, Gregory B. Lawrence, Timothy J. Sullivan

Abstract

Sustaining recent progress in mitigating acid pollution could require lower emissions caps that will give rise to real or perceived tradeoffs between healthy ecosystems and inexpensive energy. Because most impacts of acid rain affect ecosystem functions that are poorly understood by policy-makers and the public, an ecosystem services (ES) framework can help to measure how pollution affects human well-being. Focused on the Adirondack region (USA), a global 'hot-spot' of acid pollution, we measured how the chronic acidification of the region's forests, lakes, and streams has affected the potential economic and cultural benefits they provide to society. We estimated that acid-impaired hardwood forests provide roughly half of the potential benefits of forests on moderate to well-buffered soils - an estimated loss of ∼ $10,000 ha(-1) in net present value of wood products, maple syrup, carbon sequestration, and visual quality. Acidic deposition has had only nominal impact - relative to the effects of surficial geology and till depth - on the capacity of Adirondack lakes and streams to provide water suitable for drinking. However, as pH declines in lakes, the estimated value of recreational fishing decreases significantly due to loss of desirable fish such as trout. Hatchery stocking programs have partially offset the pollution-mediated losses of fishery value, most effectively in the pH range 4.8-5.5, but are costly and limited in scope. Although any estimates of the monetary 'damages' of acid rain have significant uncertainties, our findings highlight some of the more tangible economic and cultural benefits of pollution mitigation efforts, which continue to face litigation and political opposition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 1%
Unknown 68 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 19%
Student > Master 11 16%
Student > Postgraduate 9 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Other 14 20%
Unknown 10 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 22 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 22%
Engineering 8 12%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 6%
Chemistry 3 4%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 9 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2017.
All research outputs
#9,372,153
of 12,211,426 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Management
#1,498
of 2,008 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#174,295
of 266,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Management
#37
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,211,426 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,008 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,196 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.