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Estrogen deficiency accelerates lumbar facet joints arthritis

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, May 2017
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Title
Estrogen deficiency accelerates lumbar facet joints arthritis
Published in
Scientific Reports, May 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-01427-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hao Chen, Hai Zhu, Kai Zhang, Kangwu Chen, Huilin Yang

Abstract

Dramatic increase in the prevalence of lumbar facet joint (LFJ) arthritis in women around the age of menopause indicates a protective role for estrogen in LFJ arthritis. To date, there is no evidence for this indication and the mechanism of such an effect remains poorly understood. In this study, ovariectomized (OVX) mice were used to mimic the estrogen-deficient status of post-menopausal women. Micro-CT and immunohistochemistry was employed to assess the morphological and molecular changes in ovariectomy-induced LFJ arthritis. The results show that the LFJ subchondral bone mass was significantly decreased in OVX mice, with increased cavities on the interface of the subchondral bone. Severe cartilage degradation was observed in ovariectomy-induced LFJ arthritis. Increased blood vessels and innervations were also found in degenerated LFJ, particularly in the subchondral bone area. 17β-Estradiol treatment efficiently suppressed LFJ subchondral bone turnover, markedly inhibited cartilage degradation, and increased blood vessel and nerve ending growth in degenerated LFJ in OVX mice. Our study reveals that estrogen is a key factor in regulating LFJ metabolism. Severe LFJ degeneration occurs when estrogen is absent in vivo. Collapsed subchondral bone may be the initiation of this process, and estrogen replacement therapy can effectively prevent degeneration of LFJ under estrogen-deficient conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 26%
Student > Postgraduate 4 21%
Student > Master 3 16%
Professor 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Psychology 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2017.
All research outputs
#8,499,921
of 9,770,649 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#38,689
of 46,898 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,424
of 263,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#2,674
of 3,280 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,770,649 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 46,898 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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