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Drought-mortality relationships for tropical forests

Overview of attention for article published in New Phytologist, July 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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311 Dimensions

Readers on

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647 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Drought-mortality relationships for tropical forests
Published in
New Phytologist, July 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2010.03359.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oliver L. Phillips, Geertje van der Heijden, Simon L. Lewis, Gabriela López-González, Luiz E. O. C. Aragão, Jon Lloyd, Yadvinder Malhi, Abel Monteagudo, Samuel Almeida, Esteban Alvarez Dávila, Iêda Amaral, Sandy Andelman, Ana Andrade, Luzmila Arroyo, Gerardo Aymard, Tim R. Baker, Lilian Blanc, Damien Bonal, Átila Cristina Alves de Oliveira, Kuo-Jung Chao, Nallaret Dávila Cardozo, Lola da Costa, Ted R. Feldpausch, Joshua B. Fisher, Nikolaos M. Fyllas, Maria Aparecida Freitas, David Galbraith, Emanuel Gloor, Niro Higuchi, Eurídice Honorio, Eliana Jiménez, Helen Keeling, Tim J. Killeen, Jon C. Lovett, Patrick Meir, Casimiro Mendoza, Alexandra Morel, Percy Núñez Vargas, Sandra Patiño, Kelvin S-H. Peh, Antonio Peña Cruz, Adriana Prieto, Carlos A. Quesada, Fredy Ramírez, Hirma Ramírez, Agustín Rudas, Rafael Salamão, Michael Schwarz, Javier Silva, Marcos Silveira, J. W. Ferry Slik, Bonaventure Sonké, Anne Sota Thomas, Juliana Stropp, James R. D. Taplin, Rodolfo Vásquez, Emilio Vilanova

Abstract

*The rich ecology of tropical forests is intimately tied to their moisture status. Multi-site syntheses can provide a macro-scale view of these linkages and their susceptibility to changing climates. Here, we report pan-tropical and regional-scale analyses of tree vulnerability to drought. *We assembled available data on tropical forest tree stem mortality before, during, and after recent drought events, from 119 monitoring plots in 10 countries concentrated in Amazonia and Borneo. *In most sites, larger trees are disproportionately at risk. At least within Amazonia, low wood density trees are also at greater risk of drought-associated mortality, independent of size. For comparable drought intensities, trees in Borneo are more vulnerable than trees in the Amazon. There is some evidence for lagged impacts of drought, with mortality rates remaining elevated 2 yr after the meteorological event is over. *These findings indicate that repeated droughts would shift the functional composition of tropical forests toward smaller, denser-wooded trees. At very high drought intensities, the linear relationship between tree mortality and moisture stress apparently breaks down, suggesting the existence of moisture stress thresholds beyond which some tropical forests would suffer catastrophic tree mortality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 647 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 14 2%
United States 12 2%
Colombia 4 <1%
Spain 4 <1%
Japan 3 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Panama 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Other 9 1%
Unknown 597 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 150 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 132 20%
Student > Master 90 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 62 10%
Student > Bachelor 34 5%
Other 141 22%
Unknown 38 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 239 37%
Environmental Science 233 36%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 66 10%
Engineering 13 2%
Social Sciences 7 1%
Other 29 4%
Unknown 60 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2019.
All research outputs
#3,498,236
of 14,079,326 outputs
Outputs from New Phytologist
#2,662
of 5,801 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,480
of 86,715 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New Phytologist
#9
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,079,326 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,801 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 86,715 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.