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Overweight People Have Low Levels of Implicit Weight Bias, but Overweight Nations Have High Levels of Implicit Weight Bias

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters

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60 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Overweight People Have Low Levels of Implicit Weight Bias, but Overweight Nations Have High Levels of Implicit Weight Bias
Published in
PLoS ONE, December 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0083543
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maddalena Marini, Natarajan Sriram, Konrad Schnabel, Norbert Maliszewski, Thierry Devos, Bo Ekehammar, Reinout Wiers, Cai HuaJian, Mónika Somogyi, Kimihiro Shiomura, Simone Schnall, Félix Neto, Yoav Bar-Anan, Michelangelo Vianello, Alfonso Ayala, Gabriel Dorantes, Jaihyun Park, Selin Kesebir, Antonio Pereira, Bogdan Tulbure, Tuulia Ortner, Irena Stepanikova, Anthony G. Greenwald, Brian A. Nosek, Marini M, Sriram N, Schnabel K, Maliszewski N, Devos T, Ekehammar B, Wiers R, Huajian C, Somogyi M, Shiomura K, Schnall S, Neto F, Bar-Anan Y, Vianello M, Ayala A, Dorantes G, Park J, Kesebir S, Pereira A, Tulbure B, Ortner T, Stepanikova I, Greenwald AG, Nosek BA, Andrea Serino

Abstract

Although a greater degree of personal obesity is associated with weaker negativity toward overweight people on both explicit (i.e., self-report) and implicit (i.e., indirect behavioral) measures, overweight people still prefer thin people on average. We investigated whether the national and cultural context - particularly the national prevalence of obesity - predicts attitudes toward overweight people independent of personal identity and weight status. Data were collected from a total sample of 338,121 citizens from 71 nations in 22 different languages on the Project Implicit website (https://implicit.harvard.edu/) between May 2006 and October 2010. We investigated the relationship of the explicit and implicit weight bias with the obesity both at the individual (i.e., across individuals) and national (i.e., across nations) level. Explicit weight bias was assessed with self-reported preference between overweight and thin people; implicit weight bias was measured with the Implicit Association Test (IAT). The national estimates of explicit and implicit weight bias were obtained by averaging the individual scores for each nation. Obesity at the individual level was defined as Body Mass Index (BMI) scores, whereas obesity at the national level was defined as three national weight indicators (national BMI, national percentage of overweight and underweight people) obtained from publicly available databases. Across individuals, greater degree of obesity was associated with weaker implicit negativity toward overweight people compared to thin people. Across nations, in contrast, a greater degree of national obesity was associated with stronger implicit negativity toward overweight people compared to thin people. This result indicates a different relationship between obesity and implicit weight bias at the individual and national levels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 56 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 27%
Student > Bachelor 9 15%
Student > Master 7 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 12%
Professor 6 10%
Other 15 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 35 58%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 15%
Unspecified 5 8%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Other 3 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2018.
All research outputs
#1,957,262
of 9,763,361 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#31,979
of 124,155 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,908
of 189,098 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,630
of 7,764 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,763,361 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 124,155 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,098 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7,764 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.